Economics

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Essay, 2014
Benn Steil

In today’s dollar-dominated financial system, changes in U.S. monetary policy can have immediate and significant global effects, wrecking economies and toppling regimes. As a result, for many countries monetary sovereignty is nothing but a dream.

Snapshot,
Peter Martin and David Cohen

At times, Xi has appeared to be a reformer in the mold of Deng Xiaoping. At other times, he has appeared nostalgic for the revolutionary socialism of Mao Zedong. In truth, he is taking his cues from both.

Essay, 2014
Sue Mi Terry

Contrary to popular belief, the reunification of North Korea and South Korea would not spell disaster for South Korea, nor would it pose an unacceptable risk for the United States, China, and Japan. Rather, it would produce massive economic and social benefits for the peninsula and the region.

Snapshot,
Petr Polak

With its aging population and struggling financial sector, Europe increasingly resembles Japan in the 1990s. The most disquieting similarity is that the European Central Bank, like its Japanese counterpart, seems unwilling to act.

Snapshot,
Wojciech Kopczuk and Allison Schrager

There’s limited evidence that wealth inequality has actually worsened in the United States in the last 30 years. And, even if it does eventually get worse, imposing a tax on wealth is a terrible way to promote equality. It would actually benefit the super wealthy the most.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

Sanctions might not stop Russia's destabilization of Ukraine, but Western policymakers should embrace them for another reason: because they can put a nail in the coffin of the project that started the Ukraine crisis to begin with -- Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Western leaders seek to force Putin to change course by threatening economic damage. But, fearing the economic blowback that sanctions may inflict on their own countries, they allow corporate self-interest to justify a weak and divided response. Those fears are misplaced.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum and Damien Ma

For its broader reform project to succeed, China needs a new “federalism” -- a realignment of central and local government power -- that can adapt to the conditions of a rapidly changing economy.

Snapshot,
Neil K. Shenai

India's economy is hampered by slow growth, a widening current account deficit, and a depreciating rupee -- a combination of problems with no easy fix. Making matters worse, the immediate cause of these problems doesn’t lie in India, but the United States.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Hopkin and Mark Blyth

Wealthy Russian expats seem to wield substantial influence over the British government's approach to the Ukraine crisis, which points to the outsized role that such super-rich play in British politics. But all that foreign money reveals deep structural weaknesses in the British economy.

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