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Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Snapshot,
Sarah E. Mendelson

Government harassment of independent organizations is as old as the state system itself, but recent intimidation campaigns have a twenty-first-century twist.

Snapshot,
Michael T. Klare

The debate over whether U.S. interests abroad are better served by hard power or soft power is perennial. Now there is a third option—energy power—about which Democrats and Republicans seem to agree.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Snapshot,
Rebecca M. Aragon and Jean M. Flannery

Foreign sovereign employers often assume that they are immune from U.S. court jurisdiction. That isn't exactly true, and believing it could be a costly mistake.

Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

To date, three million Syrians have fled the war in their country. The exodus has now surpassed the Rwandan genocide as the largest refugee crisis since World War II.

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