Criminal Law

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Timothy William Waters

Despite protests from Libya, the ICC's decision to try Saif al-Islam, the son of the Libyan dictator Muammar al-Qaddafi, might seem to offer a chance for real justice. It doesn't.

Snapshot,
Pin Ho and Wenguang Huang

Former Chinese politician Bo Xilai is expected to be sentenced for corruption this weekend. If his trial had been a TV drama, the closing credits for directing and scripting would have gone to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the Communist Party’s secret anti-corruption body. Here's how the commission works.

Snapshot,
Malcolm Beith

In reshaping the war on drugs to support the war on terrorism, the United States has found a better way to fight both.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
David Kaye

The Obama administration has bolstered the International Criminal Court in an effort to prevent atrocities worldwide. Still, Congressional opposition and developments in conflicts abroad might make it hard for Washington to continue to cooperate with the court.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2013
Pierre N. Leval

This week, the U.S. Supreme Court dealt a blow to foreign victims of foreign human rights abusers who wish to use U.S. courts to sue their abusers. As a top legal scholar and federal judge wrote in this article--which Justice Stephen Breyer cited in his opinion--such lawsuits offered victims some measure of solace and gave substance to underenforced human rights laws.

Snapshot,
Juan de Onis

In November, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's closest adviser was sentenced to ten years in jail for corruption. Now, the highest court seems determined to go after Lula himself. Whatever the final result, the judges' campaign has convinced Brazil's taxpaying middle class that it is time to stop tolerating graft.

Snapshot,
Ido Baum

The slew of recent high-profile graft cases in Israel makes it seem that Israeli politicians are more corrupt than others. Part of this can be chalked up to aggressive state prosecutors and an open media. But the problem is not simply one of public perception.

Comment, May/June 2012
Robert C. Bonner

Mexico is winning its death match against the drug cartels and rebuilding once-corrupt institutions in the process. But an election is approaching, and the candidates are calling for a truce. Mexico can take its place in the sun, but only if it wipes out the cartels for good.

Syndicate content