Human Rights

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Snapshot,
Sarah E. Mendelson

With the MDGs coming to an end in 2015, the international community is now close to agreeing to what comes next. And here, there is some good news for those working to end trafficking. In several places, the draft goals explicitly and implicitly address combating human trafficking and ending modern slavery.

Snapshot,
Betcy Jose

As the reaction to the death of al Shabab leader Ahmed Abdi Godane has shown, open condemnation of targeted killings as violations of international law has slowly given way to silence. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Emily Dyer and Louise Millet

Some supporters of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had hoped that he would dial back attacks on women's rights. Just a year into his time in office, though, he has left those backers disappointed. In some cases, his government is just as bad as his predecessor’s.

Snapshot,
William Michael Schmidli

The ubiquity of human rights rhetoric in American political life today obscures the relatively recent origins of the U.S. human rights movement. It wasn’t until the late 1960s and the 1970s that grassroots organizers, lobbyists, and members of Congress embraced human rights in reaction to the excesses of America's Cold War policies.

Snapshot,
David Kaye

An explosive new report on torture in Syria politicizes atrocities committed during Syria's civil war. It will not lead to what Syrians want and need: an independent criminal inquiry that results in international prosecutions and promotes domestic accountability.

Snapshot,
Pin Ho and Wenguang Huang

Former Chinese politician Bo Xilai is expected to be sentenced for corruption this weekend. If his trial had been a TV drama, the closing credits for directing and scripting would have gone to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the Communist Party’s secret anti-corruption body. Here's how the commission works.

Snapshot,
Lindsay Benstead, Ellen M. Lust, Jakob Wichmann

Nearly two years after NATO’s much-hailed intervention in Libya, observers fear that the country could become a failed state. Nevertheless, Libyans are optimistic about the country's future -- and for good reason.

Snapshot,
Jacob Mchangama and Guglielmo Verdirame

If human rights were a currency, its value would be in free fall, thanks to a gross inflation in the number of treaties and laws adopted by international institutions in recent years. The beneficiaries of this process? Authoritarian states.

Letter From,
Lina M. Cespedes-Baez

In the United States, LGBT rights activists are debating whether same-sex marriage can most easily be won in the court of law or in the court of public opinion. That debate looks strikingly similar to the one in Colombia, which may soon become the fifth Latin American country to adopt marriage equality.

Snapshot,
Samuel Moyn

The Supreme Court decision on Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. seemed to deal a blow to foreign victims of foreign human rights abusers who wished to the Alien Tort Statute to sue their abusers in U.S. courts. But the decision might be a blessing in disguise. The ATS never proved that useful in advancing human rights worldwide, and by slamming the door on it, the Supreme Court has pushed the human rights movement to focus on using other tools.

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