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Snapshot,
Lukas Kaelin

Earlier this year, Swiss voted to amend their constitution so that the government could regulate immigration from neighboring European countries. If Bern follows through, the days of unrestricted labor movement -- a requirement for Switzerland’s continued bilateral relationship with the European Union -- will be over.

Snapshot,
Kathleen R. McNamara

The situation in Ukraine cuts to the heart of the EU's promise -- and challenges -- as a foreign policy actor. The union still has a powerful pull for many countries, but it is sorely limited in its ability to respond to crises. It might not be able to wrest Crimea forcibly from a determined Putin, for example, but its emphasis on human security and international law will have a stealthy impact on Ukraine's evolution for years to come.

Snapshot,
Serhiy Kudelia

Although nationalist or democratic ideals played a role in motivating some Ukrainian protesters, it was ultimately their shared belief in the need to punish the sovereign’s transgressions that united them. And it is that public commitment to restrained power that puts Ukraine on a democratic path, which many other European states traveled long ago.

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

No sooner had embattled Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled office than his old nemesis, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, was back on the scene. Her return, which could upset the fragile balance among the three opposition leaders that helped boot Yanukovych, has already sparked concerns that this week marked the end of one president's rule but not the start of something new.

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

In a statement earlier today, Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych announced that he had reached a deal with the opposition to end the violence in Ukraine. Yet the events of the last few days show that it will likely take more than that to end the unrest in Kiev.

Comment, 2014
Jan-Werner Müller

Ten years ago, eight eastern European states joined the European Union, seemingly locking them onto an upward developmental trajectory. But now this supposed triumph is in serious doubt, as most those countries are experiencing profound political crises.

Snapshot,
Annabelle Chapman

In recent weeks, three opposition politicians have attempted to guide the protests in Ukraine: Vitali Klitschko, Oleh Tyahnybok, and Arseniy Yatsenyuk. With violence now rising in Kiev’s Independence Square, they must decide what to do next.

Postscript,
Jonas Grätz

Yanukovych's decision to snub the EU has made his job a lot harder. Hundreds of thousands of Ukrainian citizens have taken to the streets in support of European values, his own political base has lost trust in him, and Russia may soon decide it prefers to work with a less toxic partner. The EU might just come out of all of this a winner.

Comment, Jan/Feb 2014
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Over the last 25 years, Poland has enjoyed peace, a booming economy, and integration with the rest of Europe. Behind that positive story lie smart economic reforms and the bond Poland formed with Europe’s leading economy, Germany.

Snapshot,
Jonas Grätz

This week, German Chancellor Angela Merkel warned that the shadows of the Cold War are still with us. Nowhere are they darker, she intimated, than over those countries situated between the EU and Russia. She was right. And most recently, the two powers have been doing battle over Ukraine, which must now decide whether to sign an Association Agreement with the EU or join the Russian Customs Union.

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