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Snapshot,
Jeremy Shapiro and Riccardo Alcaro

A good high representative can move the EU in the right direction, as long as he or she understands the subtleties of the role. With the support of skilled advisers, Mogherini can do just that, becoming the high representative the EU needs.

Snapshot,
Stuart Gottlieb and Eric Lorber

Greater interdependence reduces the likelihood of conflict between nations or groups of nations by increasing the cost of conflict for all of them. However, as the EU-Russian case shows, the logic can also work in reverse. It is incredibly difficult to punish economic partners for international aggression.

Postscript,
R. Daniel Kelemen

Last Friday, EU leaders voted to nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as the next president of the European Commission. Juncker’s nomination constituted a major victory for the European Parliament and a humiliating defeat for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein and Péter Krekó

Earlier this week, as Europe was preparing for continent-wide parliamentary elections, Hungary was busy asking the EU Parliament to revoke diplomatic immunity for Béla Kovács, a prominent representative of Hungary’s far-right Jobbik party, in order to charge him with spying on the EU for Russia.

Snapshot,
Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman

The modern innovators of Internet human rights are not U.S. leaders or bold Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. They are stodgy bureaucrats, politicians, and lawyers in Brussels, Berlin, and Strasbourg.

Snapshot,
Lukas Kaelin

Earlier this year, Swiss voted to amend their constitution so that the government could regulate immigration from neighboring European countries. If Bern follows through, the days of unrestricted labor movement -- a requirement for Switzerland’s continued bilateral relationship with the European Union -- will be over.

Snapshot,
Kathleen R. McNamara

The situation in Ukraine cuts to the heart of the EU's promise -- and challenges -- as a foreign policy actor. The union still has a powerful pull for many countries, but it is sorely limited in its ability to respond to crises. It might not be able to wrest Crimea forcibly from a determined Putin, for example, but its emphasis on human security and international law will have a stealthy impact on Ukraine's evolution for years to come.

Snapshot,
Serhiy Kudelia

Although nationalist or democratic ideals played a role in motivating some Ukrainian protesters, it was ultimately their shared belief in the need to punish the sovereign’s transgressions that united them. And it is that public commitment to restrained power that puts Ukraine on a democratic path, which many other European states traveled long ago.

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

No sooner had embattled Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych fled office than his old nemesis, former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, was back on the scene. Her return, which could upset the fragile balance among the three opposition leaders that helped boot Yanukovych, has already sparked concerns that this week marked the end of one president's rule but not the start of something new.

Letter From,
Annabelle Chapman

In a statement earlier today, Ukrainian President Victor Yanukovych announced that he had reached a deal with the opposition to end the violence in Ukraine. Yet the events of the last few days show that it will likely take more than that to end the unrest in Kiev.

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