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Snapshot,
Edward P. Joseph and Janusz Bugajski

To help contain Russia, Washington must use its influence to break the stalemate within Europe over NATO and EU expansion in the Balkans.

Snapshot,
Michael E. Brown

For 20 years, NATO security policy has been guided by flawed assumptions about Russia and the future of the West. Its leaders are now learning about those errors the hard way. As they scramble to respond to Russian aggression in Ukraine, they need to get back to NATO's core mission.

Snapshot,
Michael E. Brown

For 20 years, NATO security policy has been guided by flawed assumptions about Russia and the future of the West. Its leaders are now learning about those errors the hard way. As they scramble to respond to Russian aggression in Ukraine, they need to get back to NATO's core mission.

Snapshot,
Jan Joel Andersson

Western leaders should start booking flights to Stockholm and Helsinki to make the case that Sweden and Finland would not only be most welcome in NATO but that the countries have a responsibility to their own citizens -- as well as to the citizens of neighboring countries -- to join and become part of a long-term solution to counter Russia in Eastern Europe.

Snapshot,
Michael O'Hanlon

Should Russia march into eastern Ukraine, the best way to respond would be to set up a permanent brigade of American light forces in the most vulnerable NATO members, namely, the Baltics -- Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania.

Interview,
Anders Fogh Rasmussen

The secretary general of NATO speaks with Foreign Affairs about Russia and Ukraine, NATO enlargement, and the organization's responsibility to live up to its Article 5 commitments.

Interview, May/June 2013

Poland's minister of foreign affairs speaks with Foreign Affairs about his country's history, its future, and its place in Europe.

Snapshot,
Jeanne Shaheen

A host of issues confront NATO leaders this weekend in Chicago. Success depends on prioritizing Afghanistan, the Smart Defense Program, and enlargement. Russia can wait.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2012
Ivo H. Daalder and James G. Stavridis

NATO’s operation in Libya has rightly been praised for saving lives and ending a tyrannical regime, write the U.S. permanent representative to NATO and its supreme allied commander for Europe. But to replicate the success, member states must reinforce their political cohesion and improve the burden sharing that made the mission work.

Snapshot,
Michael Weiss

More and more outsiders are calling for a humanitarian intervention in Syria to stop Bashar al-Assad's killing sprees. But for this to work, Syria's various opposition groups will have to first coalesce into a single, unified political and military force.

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