Law & Institutions

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Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Snapshot,
Sarah E. Mendelson

Government harassment of independent organizations is as old as the state system itself, but recent intimidation campaigns have a twenty-first-century twist.

Snapshot,
Stewart Patrick and Naomi Egel

The OECD's approach to bringing in emerging powers as "key partners" is a smart way to remain relevant in a quickly shifting global landscape. Other multilateral organizations should pay attention. 

Snapshot,
Michael T. Klare

The debate over whether U.S. interests abroad are better served by hard power or soft power is perennial. Now there is a third option—energy power—about which Democrats and Republicans seem to agree.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

If and when Russia becomes friendly toward the West, Ukraine’s strategic importance will fade. Until then, defending Ukraine’s interests—security, stability, prosperity, and democracy—is the best way to defend the West’s own.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum

As Asian countries increasingly rely on one another for trade, investment, and other economic public goods, Washington risks ceding leadership and missing opportunities by tilting at ideas whose trajectory it cannot easily halt and whose historical and ideological roots run deep.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Talk of overturning austerity aside, Greece still needs the last 7.2 billion euro installment of the bailout to cover its financing gap. For the time being, then, the new government will need to abide by the program’s requirements—that is, the very combination of austerity and reform that Syriza has pledged to overturn. This may be enough to break the party.

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