Law & Institutions

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Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

If and when Russia becomes friendly toward the West, Ukraine’s strategic importance will fade. Until then, defending Ukraine’s interests—security, stability, prosperity, and democracy—is the best way to defend the West’s own.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum

As Asian countries increasingly rely on one another for trade, investment, and other economic public goods, Washington risks ceding leadership and missing opportunities by tilting at ideas whose trajectory it cannot easily halt and whose historical and ideological roots run deep.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Talk of overturning austerity aside, Greece still needs the last 7.2 billion euro installment of the bailout to cover its financing gap. For the time being, then, the new government will need to abide by the program’s requirements—that is, the very combination of austerity and reform that Syriza has pledged to overturn. This may be enough to break the party.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

What started off as a relatively simple customs union in early 2014 has been transformed by treaty into a single economic space. But expansion has come at the cost of the union’s coherence, and as Russia’s economy spirals into crisis, the prognosis for 2015 is dire.

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Tomorrow, the French National Assembly is set to vote on a resolution recognizing a Palestinian state. Although the act would be nonbinding, the vote is a referendum on whether France can follow through on its claim as the West's truest champion of the Palestinian cause.

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