Corruption

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Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein and Bojan Bugaric

On November 16, when the Romanian people elected as president Klaus Iohannis, an ethnic German who ran a vigorous campaign against corruption, they shattered a number of illusions about politics in eastern Europe.

Snapshot,
Alexander Lebedev and Vladislav Inozemtsev

The world needs a new international convention to combat corruption -- a global epidemic that erodes government institutions, fuels unrest, and increasingly threatens the stability of the West.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Elizabeth C. Economy

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive, and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

An end to Russia’s intrusions into Ukraine would bring some measure of respite to Kiev. However, that alone will not be enough to place the country on a truly new path. For that, Ukraine must overcome its self-inflicted problems, in particular rampant and pervasive corruption.

Comment, JUL/AUG 2014
Stephen R. Weissman

Newly available evidence shows that the CIA engaged in pervasive political meddling and paramilitary action in Congo during the 1960s -- and that the local CIA station chief directly influenced the events that led to the death of Patrice Lumumba, the country's first democratically elected prime minister.

Comment, JUL/AUG 2014
Ray Takeyh

Conventional wisdom about the 1953 coup in Iran rests on the myth that the CIA toppled the country's democratically elected prime minister. In reality, the coup was primarily a domestic Iranian affair, and the CIA's impact was ultimately insignificant.

Snapshot,
Lawrence P. Markowitz

Why do some weak states survive while others collapse? For Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, at least, the secret lies in the state's ability to manage corruption.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

For the world’s mining industry, the past few years have been turbulent. But those Wild West days might be coming to an end.

Snapshot,
Philip Shishkin

In just a few short years, Eugene Gourevitch has gone from Kyrgyzstan's premier financier and confidant of the ruling family, to wanted man, to FBI informant. His story shows just how business gets done in many corners of the post-Soviet world.

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