Corruption

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

An end to Russia’s intrusions into Ukraine would bring some measure of respite to Kiev. However, that alone will not be enough to place the country on a truly new path. For that, Ukraine must overcome its self-inflicted problems, in particular rampant and pervasive corruption.

Comment, 2014
Stephen R. Weissman

Newly available evidence shows that the CIA engaged in pervasive political meddling and paramilitary action in Congo during the 1960s -- and that the local CIA station chief directly influenced the events that led to the death of Patrice Lumumba, the country's first democratically elected prime minister.

Comment, 2014
Ray Takeyh

Conventional wisdom about the 1953 coup in Iran rests on the myth that the CIA toppled the country's democratically elected prime minister. In reality, the coup was primarily a domestic Iranian affair, and the CIA's impact was ultimately insignificant.

Snapshot,
Lawrence P. Markowitz

Why do some weak states survive while others collapse? For Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, at least, the secret lies in the state's ability to manage corruption.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

For the world’s mining industry, the past few years have been turbulent. But those Wild West days might be coming to an end.

Snapshot,
Philip Shishkin

In just a few short years, Eugene Gourevitch has gone from Kyrgyzstan's premier financier and confidant of the ruling family, to wanted man, to FBI informant. His story shows just how business gets done in many corners of the post-Soviet world.

Snapshot,
Pin Ho and Wenguang Huang

Former Chinese politician Bo Xilai is expected to be sentenced for corruption this weekend. If his trial had been a TV drama, the closing credits for directing and scripting would have gone to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the Communist Party’s secret anti-corruption body. Here's how the commission works.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
Ivan Krastev and Vladislav Inozemtsev

In an effort to consolidate his power and drum up public support, Russian President Vladimir Putin has launched a major anti-corruption campaign. Despite its intentions, however, the policy could prove to be Putin's demise.

Syndicate content