Corruption

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Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

For the world’s mining industry, the past few years have been turbulent. But those Wild West days might be coming to an end.

Snapshot,
Philip Shishkin

In just a few short years, Eugene Gourevitch has gone from Kyrgyzstan's premier financier and confidant of the ruling family, to wanted man, to FBI informant. His story shows just how business gets done in many corners of the post-Soviet world.

Snapshot,
Pin Ho and Wenguang Huang

Former Chinese politician Bo Xilai is expected to be sentenced for corruption this weekend. If his trial had been a TV drama, the closing credits for directing and scripting would have gone to the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection, the Communist Party’s secret anti-corruption body. Here's how the commission works.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

When his trial for corruption charges began in April, Alexei Navalny was an untested political leader with limited public support. But the logic of Putin’s rule does not require a person to be a credible challenger at the ballot box to be a threat.

Snapshot,
Ivan Krastev and Vladislav Inozemtsev

In an effort to consolidate his power and drum up public support, Russian President Vladimir Putin has launched a major anti-corruption campaign. Despite its intentions, however, the policy could prove to be Putin's demise.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

The case against him may be phony, but Alexei Navalny, the Russian blogger and opposition activist, faces long odds in his trial, which begins Wednesday. When Putin cannot co-opt his enemies, it seems, he has other means of crushing them.

Snapshot,
Juan de Onis

In November, former Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva's closest adviser was sentenced to ten years in jail for corruption. Now, the highest court seems determined to go after Lula himself. Whatever the final result, the judges' campaign has convinced Brazil's taxpaying middle class that it is time to stop tolerating graft.

Snapshot,
Ido Baum

The slew of recent high-profile graft cases in Israel makes it seem that Israeli politicians are more corrupt than others. Part of this can be chalked up to aggressive state prosecutors and an open media. But the problem is not simply one of public perception.

Comment, Nov/Dec 2012
Héctor Aguilar Camín and Jorge G. Castañeda

At first, Mexico's recent presidential election looked unpromising: the PRI, the country's long-dominant party, crept back into office, but with only 38 percent of the vote and no majority in Congress. Yet the campaign revealed just how much Mexicans actually agree on, and the new government is likely to pass long-overdue reforms.

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