Crime & Drugs

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Snapshot,
John Collins

In the blink of an eye, global debates about cannabis legalization have shifted from “whether” to “how.” In 2014, Uruguay became the first nation to explicitly regulate cannabis from seed to sale. Other countries around the world have started building their own systems. All offer insights into how the United States—and other countries—might tackle the “how.”

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Snapshot,
Patricio Asfura-Heim and Ralph H. Espach

In order to maximize the benefits and avoid the pitfalls associated with bringing vigilantes into the fold, the Mexican government should consider a few lessons from around the world.

Snapshot,
Malcolm Beith

In reshaping the war on drugs to support the war on terrorism, the United States has found a better way to fight both.

Snapshot,
Gwen McClure

Once more, torture is rampant in South Africa. Unlike under apartheid, the victims are not political prisoners but young men, mostly in poor and lawless townships, who are suspected of petty crime. And that is why many South Africans are willing to turn a blind eye.

Snapshot,
Heraldo Muñoz

Today, former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf was indicted in the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. The UN official who conducted the special investigation into her death recounts his own search for answers -- and why, he believes, most everyone is guilty.

Snapshot,
Adam Heffez

In a little over a decade, Sana’a, Yemen, might become the world’s first capital to run out of water, turning its millions of citizens into water refugees. A major cause: the cultivation of qat, a mild narcotic plant that takes unusually large amounts of water to farm and to which much of Yemen's population is addicted.

Snapshot,
Oliver Kaplan and Michael Albertus

Even as Colombian troops fight FARC rebels in the jungle, the two sides are busy negotiating a peace deal. Land reform could pave the way to a lasting settlement and drive down the country’s inequality in the process.

Snapshot,
Amir A. Afkhami

The narcotics trade is ruining Afghanistan and spreading death and addiction around the world. Kabul needs a new approach to the problem -- and neighboring Iran happens to offer a great model.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2013
Peter Andreas

Despite media hoopla, cross-border crime -- illegal drugs sales, evasion of taxes, intellectual property theft, and money laundering -- is hardly a new phenomenon. For much of history, moreover, the United States was as much perpetrator as victim. Recognizing this awkward truth should help cool down overheated debates about today’s transnational problems and how to respond to them.

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