Education

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Charles A. Nelson, Nathan A. Fox, and Charles H. Zeanah

Today, orphanages are common in many parts of the world. But a look at young people who spent their childhoods in institutions in Romania reveals just how developmentally damaging such places can be.

Snapshot,
Suki Kim

In that relentless vacuum, nothing moved. No news came in or out. No phone calls, no emails, no letters, no ideas not prescribed by the regime. Thirty missionaries disguised as teachers and 270 male North Korean students and me, the sole writer disguised as a missionary disguised as a teacher. Locked in the prison disguised as a campus in an empty Pyongyang suburb, heavily guarded around the clock, all we had was one another.

Snapshot,
Isobel Coleman and Sigrid von Wendel

Boko Haram, whose name roughly translates to “secular education is a sin,” has been committing heinous attacks across Nigeria's north for years, frequently targeting schools. To fight back, Abuja must double down on education even as it rethinks its counterterrorism strategy.

Snapshot,
Don Steinberg and Tara Sonenshine

Disability is a national and global issue, and it is time for a comprehensive approach that includes education and development.

Snapshot,
Eduardo J. Gómez

By some measures, the BRICS have squandered their years of plenty. Even as they poured money into building dynamic economies and gaining global power, they neglected to invest in their own populations. Another group of nations -- Mexico, Colombia, and Singapore -- has struck a better balance and, as a result, makes a better model than the BRICS for other emerging economies.

Snapshot,
Peter Campbell and Michael C. Desch

The mania for ranking universities has fostered a guild mentality that discourages real-world relevance among scholars and, in turn, violates academia's social contract.

Essay, May/June 2013
Jal Mehta

Since the end of the industrial age, Americans have worried about improving their education system. But the country has never been able to make much progress. Other nations do it better, and the United States must learn from their examples if it hopes to catch up.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2013
Jerry Z. Muller

Inequality is rising across the post-industrial capitalist world. The problem is not caused by politics and politics will never be able to eliminate it. But simply ignoring it could generate a populist backlash. Governments must accept that today as ever, inequality and insecurity are the inevitable results of market operations. Their challenge is to find ways of shielding citizens from capitalism's adverse consequences -- even as they preserve the dynamism that produces capitalism's vast economic and cultural benefits in the first place.

Essay, Jan/Feb 2013
Kimberly J. Morgan

The amount of resources the American public and private sectors commit to all forms of welfare is massive -- the fifth highest outlay in the world. Yet the American way of distributing that money does less to reduce poverty and inequality than that of virtually any other rich democracy. The United States can, and should, reform its welfare state, and it does not need to resort to European style socialism to do so.

Comment, Sept/Oct 2012
Adam Tooze

Germany seems like Europe’s lone island of fiscal stability, but trouble lurks under its impressive export-fueled growth. An obsession with debt and austerity has blocked domestic investment as the country has ignored problems such as a shrinking work force and outdated infrastructure. Germany needs to borrow and spend more or face the end of its economic miracle.

Syndicate content