Health

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Letter From,
Javier Alvarez

The Liberian government and international organizations have been most focused on containing Ebola, as they should be. The containment policies, however, have come with unintended economic consequences that need to be addressed to avert an even worse crisis.

Snapshot,
Fran Quigley

The two deadliest outbreaks of this century -- cholera and Ebola -- can be traced to one thing: poverty

Snapshot,
Daphna Canetti, Sivan Hirsch-Hoefler, and Ehud Eiran

Being exposed to violence makes one more likely to reject of peace and back extremists. Any effort to settle the conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians must, therefore, include greater efforts to deal with the personal traumas on both sides that now drive this 100-year war.

Snapshot,
Kim Yi Dionne

Fear of the Ebola virus and an out-of-control epidemic have made it easier for governments around the world to focus on security and military responses to public health solutions. Here's why that is a bad thing.

Snapshot,
Fran Quigley

A deadly 2010 outbreak of cholera in Haiti was quickly traced to a UN camp, but the UN has been slow to take responsibility. In response, Haitian lawyers and advocates have decided to sue the international organization for damages. They might not win their case, but their efforts could at least leave Haiti with a better-functioning legal system.

Snapshot,
Don Steinberg and Tara Sonenshine

Disability is a national and global issue, and it is time for a comprehensive approach that includes education and development.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Jonathan Alter

Whether the Obama administration’s bungled rollout of HealthCare.gov will permanently tarnish the administration’s legacy is unclear, but it certainly offers important -- and depressing -- insights into the president’s operating style and the administration’s culture.

Snapshot,
Eduardo J. Gómez

By some measures, the BRICS have squandered their years of plenty. Even as they poured money into building dynamic economies and gaining global power, they neglected to invest in their own populations. Another group of nations -- Mexico, Colombia, and Singapore -- has struck a better balance and, as a result, makes a better model than the BRICS for other emerging economies.

Essay, Jan/Feb 2014
Lane Kenworthy

Obamacare’s success will not mean a leap to socialism, nor would its failure mean the end of liberalism. What the ACA really represents is yet another step on the United States' long, halting journey away from the classical liberal capitalist state and toward a peculiarly American version of social democracy.

Snapshot,
Peter L. Levin and Shahid N. Shah

Assigning blame for Healthcare.gov’s disastrous rollout has been about as entertaining as thrashing about in a room full of piñatas without a blindfold. So plentiful are the targets that some wonder whether failure was inevitable and, more generally, whether democracy is incompatible with technocracy. In both cases, the answer is no.

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