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Snapshot,
Ellen Mickiewicz

Moscow had hoped to use breathless coverage of the Olympics to ease domestic anxiety after a rough year of protests and economic malaise. Unfortunately, however, news out of Ukraine has overshadowed all else and, as Russians tune in, they are only feeling more insecure.

Snapshot,
Emma Sokoloff-Rubin

The massive protests of the past few weeks have demonstrated how deeply Brazilians feel the right to speak out against their government. But just 30 years ago, the country was ruled by a brutal dictatorship that blocked free expression. A group of young playwrights sought to change that.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

As protests have raged in Istanbul and across Turkey these last two weeks, the press has rolled over and deferred to the ruling party -- a new low point for the country already known as the world’s top jailer of journalists.

Snapshot,
David Robinson

Instead of complaining to the Chinese about Internet censorship and promoting niche software for dissidents to get around it, Washington should focus its energy on making sure American businesses in China have reliable and secure web access. That would be an easier sell in China and would help advance human rights more than the current approach.

Collection,
Jason Q. Ng

See 11 phrases that are blocked on Weibo -- and learn the reasons why.

Snapshot,
Alexis Wichowski

The U.S. embassy in Cairo's Twitter feed is once again embroiled in controversy. As the episode shows, tweeting can occasionally lead to trouble. But social media is good for governments and for citizens. For officials to ignore or disdain it would amount to professional malpractice.

Essay, May/June 2013
Kenneth Neil Cukier and Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger

Everyone knows that the Internet has changed how businesses operate, governments function, and people live. But a new, less visible technological trend is proving just as transformative: big data.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

The surprisingly strong performance of Yair Lapid in Israel's election, coupled with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's losses, have led many to conclude that Israeli voters have shifted to the center. But Lapid's party is conservative where it counts—on security issues—and the voters who left Netanyahu largely went even further to the right.

Snapshot,
Jytte Klausen

Just as Mubarak played up the controversy over Danish cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad in 2006 in order to improve his domestic standing, so Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi's government has stoked popular outrage now. But the flames he has fanned will make life hotter for him as well as the United States.

Review Essay, Jul/Aug 2012
Andrew J. Nathan

A new book aims to settle the long-running debate over democracy and "Asian values," arguing that culture is not to blame for the fact that only six of the 16 countries of East and Southeast Asia are functioning democracies.

 

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