Political Development

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Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

Observers accuse Netanyahu of using his recent speech to the U.S. Congress to drum up support in the upcoming Israeli election. But even there, his talk will probably matter very little.

Snapshot,
Gregory Feifer

Nemtsov was no ordinary Russian opposition figure. Others may have been as brave, as dedicated, and as intelligent. But none have matched his position as a symbol of post-Soviet promise who reached crowning heights in government and later upheld his ideals as a dogged Kremlin critic.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Greece and its European partners are now expected to reach a new, long-term deal for the country’s financing by June. Given the dire state of the Greek finances and its continuing exclusion from bond markets, this agreement could take the form of a third bailout reaching 30 billion euros.

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein, Péter Krekó, and Attila Juhász

When Hungary passed laws entitling Hungarians living abroad to Hungarian passports and then the right to vote in Hungarian elections, it fanned dangerous nationalistic flames and fueled fears of secessionist movements in Hungarian communities beyond the country’s border.

Snapshot,
Omar G. Encarnación

After the radical-left Syriza party came to power in Greece, attention has turned to Spain's Podemos—a leftist party gaining traction in the polls—that could matter even more for European austerity policies.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Schlefer

It is hard to reconcile Peña Nieto’s status as person of the year and gangster in chief. But, as a symbol of the Mexican state, he is indeed both. And, strange as it may seem, both aspects of state power derive from St. Thomas Aquinas’ medieval ideal of governance.

Snapshot,
F. Gregory Gause III

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman has moved swiftly to consolidate power. In doing so, he has raised the profile of two of the royal family’s so-called third-generation princes and sidelined a number of their cousins. In a family where, for decades, political power has been dispersed among several members, the centralization of power is certain to raise eyebrows.

Snapshot,
Mark Blyth and Cornel Ban

Just as Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon river, in spite of the warnings of the Roman Senate not to, so has Alex Tsipras, leader of the anti-austerity party, Syriza, decided to try to end austerity in Greece, in spite of Europe’s leaders saying he shouldn’t. Whether Tsipras will succeed is still unclear, but whatever happens, his victory represents a crucial turning point for Europe—a signal that time has run out on austerity policies.

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