Democratization

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Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

Rousseff seems likely to remain in office—but one might reasonably wonder why anyone would want to want to be at the helm in Brazil for what will be a number of bumpy years.

Snapshot,
Nikolay Anguelov

Nearly two years after the United States lifted its economic sanctions on Naypyidaw, the ruling military regime has stalled reforms. And worst yet, members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations don't seem to mind.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

It is clearer than ever that democracy in Nigeria is a rather thin veneer. Even so, a couple of factors make the country particularly fertile ground for democracy.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Schlefer

It is hard to reconcile Peña Nieto’s status as person of the year and gangster in chief. But, as a symbol of the Mexican state, he is indeed both. And, strange as it may seem, both aspects of state power derive from St. Thomas Aquinas’ medieval ideal of governance.

Snapshot,
Marina Ottaway

After three years of battles in the streets, in the National Constituent Assembly, and at the ballot box, Tunisia has officially completed its formal transition to democracy.

Letter From,
Alina Polyakova

A militant nationalist and a crook walk into a bar. It might sound like the beginning of a clichéd joke, but in Ukraine’s parliamentary elections, the characters are all too real, and the “bar” is Electoral District 217 in the country’s capital, Kiev.

Snapshot,
Rebecca Liao

The Fourth Plenum took a bureaucratic view of the judiciary, treating it as an ally to the regime in improving governance rather than as the people’s advocate against that regime.

Snapshot,
Intissar Fakir and Maati Monjib

Arab Spring–driven reforms might have seemed inconsequential when they were introduced in 2011. But they may be changing Morocco’s political system more than anticipated.

Snapshot,
Brian Klaas and Marcel Dirsus

On October 26, Tunisians will finally have a real and unrestricted choice at the polls. Other transitioning regimes in the Middle East and the world should take note: Democracy is not about exclusion, but about giving people a genuine choice—even, or especially, when it’s an uncomfortable one.

Snapshot,
John Delury

There is nothing inevitable about democratization China. But neither, as one former Obama administration official argued, is the students’ call for genuine democracy a mere “pipe dream.” For what history does record are long and hard-fought struggles between competing visions of political life and social order, and the students in Hong Kong have made themselves heard and their vision known.

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