Race & Ethnicity

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Snapshot,
Benjamin Miller

There seems to be little connecting recent violence in Ukraine to the destabilization of Iraq. But both conflicts spring from a common source, the mismatch between state boundaries and national identities -- a “state-to-nation imbalance.”

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay

From Turkey’s perspective, Kurdish autonomy is starting to look like a good thing. The portions of northern Iraq and Syria that are under Kurdish control are stable and peaceful -- a perfect bulwark against threats such as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). And that is why Turkey has been on good behavior with the Iraqi Kurds, is working on its relations with the Syrian Kurds, and might finally be breaking the impasse with the Kurds in its own territory.

Comment, 2014
Harold H. Saunders

In 1971, the Pakistani government orchestrated a brutal military crackdown against the Bengali population in East Pakistan -- while the United States stuck by its ally Pakistan. Gary Bass's new book spotlights the “significant complicity” of U.S. President Richard Nixon and his national security adviser, Henry Kissinger, in this “forgotten genocide.”

Essay, May/June 2014
Swanee Hunt

It would be obscene to say that the genocide in Rwanda had even the thinnest silver lining. But it did create a natural -- or unnatural -- experiment, as the country’s social, economic, and political institutions were wiped out. In important respects, the reconstructed Rwanda is a dramatically different country, especially for women.

Snapshot,
Dominique Arel

In Ukraine, language policy has become a matter of national security. Here's why it is such a divisive issue -- and what the new government can do to ease tensions.

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

Destroying or dismembering Ukraine serves no country’s interests, least of all Russia’s. After all, it is in Russia’s best interest to have a stable, prosperous, and friendly Ukraine on its borders. The only thing the move could serve is the megalomaniacal Putin.

Snapshot,
Kendrick Kuo

Beijing’s ambitious push to develop Xinjiang, a troubled region in western China, has failed to create stability there. In fact, it has only made things worse.

Snapshot,
Peter Eichstaedt

Joseph Kony is many things -- a megalomaniac, a self-proclaimed prophet, a witch doctor, a ruthless and paranoid commander. But above all, he is a survivor.

Review Essay, Sept/Oct 2013
Taeku Lee

Ira Katznelson’s history of the New Deal digs deeper than conventional accounts, detailing how Franklin Roosevelt’s agenda relied on the support of segregationist southern Democrats. “Without the South,” Katznelson asserts, “there could have been no New Deal.”

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

The United States is counting on Turkey to help oust the Syrian regime and bring about a pluralistic government. But Ankara, whose Sunni leadership sees Syria’s conflict in sectarian terms, is not on board.

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