Refugees & Migration

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Postscript,
Lauren Carasik

Obama's executive order will provide much needed humanitarian relief to some law-abiding undocumented immigrants. But it will do nothing for the unaccompanied minors and families whose desperate flight to the United States last summer may have finally pushed the White House to act.

Snapshot,
Lauren Carasik

If a decrease in border crossings is the metric upon which Obama's response to this summer's immigration crisis is judged, he has succeeded. But his is a hollow victory, particularly since it came at the cost of imperiling the lives of refugees the United States is bound to protect.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Yascha Mounk

The Tea Party and its European cousins have emerged from the enduring inability of democratic governments to satisfy their citizens’ needs. Today’s populist movements won’t subside until the legitimate grievances driving them have been addressed.

Postscript,
Ananda Rose

Crossing the border between the United States and Mexico is more dangerous than ever. Here's what happens to those who make it -- and those who don't.

Snapshot,
Karen Leigh

With its old Syria strategy in tatters, Turkey is recalibrating its approach to its neighbor to keep extremist militants out -- and the refugees in.

Snapshot,
Kemal Kirisci and Raj Salooja

Turkey has maintained a generous open-door policy for Syrian refugees. As Syrian refugees continue to pour into the country, Turkey must address their long-term status within its borders.

Snapshot,
Lukas Kaelin

Earlier this year, Swiss voted to amend their constitution so that the government could regulate immigration from neighboring European countries. If Bern follows through, the days of unrestricted labor movement -- a requirement for Switzerland’s continued bilateral relationship with the European Union -- will be over.

Snapshot,
Marisa L. Porges

Supporting refugees is costly, financially and otherwise, and Jordan is having trouble coping. The United States and key partner nations must help support the still-growing Syrian refugee population there. If it doesn't, Syria’s spillover risks destabilizing Jordan even more than it already has.

Review Essay, Jan/Feb 2014
Michael Clemens and Justin Sandefur

A new book by Paul Collier argues for a global system of coercive quotas on people moving from poorer countries to richer ones. But instead of presenting a convincing case for a moderate middle path, the book offers an egregious collection of empirical and logical errors about immigration’s supposed negative consequences.

Snapshot,
Ananda Rose

Undocumented migration is lower today than at any other time in the last 40 years, but reported migrant deaths are on the rise. Here's the story of some of those migrants and the forensic anthropologists, local lawmen, and Samaritans trying to help them.

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