Science & Technology

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Response, SEPT/OCT 2014
Ann Cavoukian

Limits on the collection of personal data should remain central to the protection of privacy.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Marvin Ammori

As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama called himself “a strong supporter of net neutrality.” But under his leadership, the Federal Communications Commission appears to have given up on the goal of maintaining an open Internet. Obama now has second chance to fix his Internet policy; here’s what he should do.

Snapshot,
Michael Moran

France plans to sell Russia two helicopter carriers this year, giving the Russian navy something it currently lacks: the ability to carry out swift seaborne invasions on its neighbors. If Washington wants to sink the sale, it should should buy the ships itself.

Snapshot,
Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman

The modern innovators of Internet human rights are not U.S. leaders or bold Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. They are stodgy bureaucrats, politicians, and lawyers in Brussels, Berlin, and Strasbourg.

Snapshot,
Jessica Hatcher

What’s particularly disturbing about the latest Ebola outbreak is that the United States has recently developed treatments for the disease. But, despite lobbying from scientists, the drugs have not been put to the test.

Snapshot,
Stacie L. Pettyjohn

Last month, Washington pledged to give up control of ICANN, a nonprofit that manages the Internet's domain name system. Critics say the move will empower repressive regimes to restrict Internet freedom. But it actually provides the best chance of preserving an open system.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Last week, Erdogan banned Twitter to try to prevent the spread of recordings of incriminating conversations between him and members of his family and inner circle. By exposing the prime minister’s abuses of power, the dirty dealings of the Gülenists (Erdogan's foes and likely purveyors of the recordings), and the weakness of the opposition, the scandal raises doubts about the future of Turkish democracy.

Review Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Jack Shafer

In his new book, Rahul Sagar asks when it is legitimate for a government official to disclose secrets. Although conventional, his answer is far too restrictive -- as the case of Edward Snowden shows.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Jonathan Alter

Whether the Obama administration’s bungled rollout of HealthCare.gov will permanently tarnish the administration’s legacy is unclear, but it certainly offers important -- and depressing -- insights into the president’s operating style and the administration’s culture.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Sarah Kreps and Micah Zenko

Armed drones are starting to rule the skies, but the United States’ monopoly over their use is fading. The Obama administration should nurture a regime to limit drone proliferation, similar to efforts to control nuclear weapons and missiles.

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