Politics & Society

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Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Snapshot,
Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore

In China, the overwhelming cultural pressure for women to marry by the age of 27—especially intense around Chinese New Year—has led to a burgeoning rent-a-boyfriend industry.

Snapshot,
Peter Pomerantsev

The West's ability to counter the Kremlin's skillful propaganda is now a matter of global security. Here's how to do it.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

In Turkey, the government and judiciary are using blasphemy laws to justify censorship.

Snapshot,
@pedestrian

In Iran, mass urbanization, increasing access to social media, and a more secular public space (despite propaganda otherwise) have made finding potential mates leagues more complicated.

Snapshot,
Claire Sadar

Many suspect Erdogan of taking Turkey in an Islamist direction. But his real objective is a different kind of state: a secular autocracy more similar to Russia than Iran.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
James L. Gibson

Apartheid’s legacy of mistrust and prejudice has prevented South Africa from establishing a truly stable multiracial democracy. But increasing contact among the races and the emergence of a black middle class offer hope of reducing the role of race in national politics.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Victor Navasky

Given the long line of kings, dictators, bureaucrats, politicos, and other would-be censors who have taken drastic action against cartoons over the years, Charlie Hebdo should shock but not surprise.

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