Politics & Society

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Comment, Nov/Dec 2014
Peter Tomsen

More than 13 years after 9/11, the Afghan war is far from over, even if Washington insists that the U.S. role in it will soon come to an end. Three recent books help explain why, and what Washington needs to do next to protect the gains that have been made.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, critics say postcommunist reforms have failed. But the evidence says otherwise. Transition states in Europe and Eurasia have become normal countries -- no worse, and sometimes better, than other states at comparable levels of development.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Elizabeth C. Economy

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive, and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

Interview, Nov/Dec 2014
Joko Widodo

Indonesia’s new president talks to Foreign Affairs about his recent victory, his national agenda, and the threat of Islamic extremism.

Interview, Nov/Dec 2014
Benigno Aquino III

The president of the Philippines talks to Foreign Affairs about economic reform, political corruption, and Chinese aggression.

Review Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Snapshot,
Fran Quigley

The two deadliest outbreaks of this century--cholera and Ebola--can be traced to one thing: poverty

Snapshot,
Andrew Hammond

UKIP’s by-election victory and last month's Scottish referendum may seem unrelated. But they both reflect a change in British politics: a relatively stable two-party system is giving way to more unpredictability.

Snapshot,
Adam Rasmi

Most Lebanese Jews left their homeland in the twentieth century. But some Lebanese are now hoping this trend can be reversed -- and there may be cause for optimism.

Snapshot,
Jamie F. Metzl

The coming revolution in genetic engineering will be exciting to some, frightening to others, and challenging for all. If not adequately addressed, it will also likely lead to major conflict both within societies and globally.

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