Politics & Society

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Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Yascha Mounk

The Tea Party and its European cousins have emerged from the enduring inability of democratic governments to satisfy their citizens’ needs. Today’s populist movements won’t subside until the legitimate grievances driving them have been addressed.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
David Frum

Three big trends -- a growing reliance on older voters, an extremist ideological turn, and an increasing internal rigidity -- have changed the Republican Party over the past decade, weakening its ability to win presidential elections and inhibiting its ability to govern.

Review Essay, SEPT/OCT 2014
John Osburg

Will Chinese economic development ultimately lead to political development? In his new book, Age of Ambition, the journalist Evan Osnos discovers what might be the missing link: the emergence in Chinese society of a search for dignity.

Response, SEPT/OCT 2014
Ann Cavoukian

Limits on the collection of personal data should remain central to the protection of privacy.

Review Essay, SEPT/OCT 2014
Ananya Vajpeyi

A successful right-wing campaign in India to suppress the work of Wendi Doniger, a prominent scholar of Hinduism, suggests that conservative voices are gaining the upper hand in the country’s long struggle between secular liberalism and religious nationalism.

Snapshot,
Kevin Russell

Haider al-Abadi, selected to be Iraq’s new prime minister, is already being hailed as a potential savior for his country. But the system of power sharing that resulted in his appointment is part of the reason that Iraq’s politics are so turbulent in the first place.

Letter From,
Aeyliya Husain

Wardah Nur never imagined that she would become a soldier. And, until ten years ago, she couldn’t have. Nur belongs to a small, elite group -- the 2013 “lady cadets,” as they are called -- the latest batch of women to train at the Pakistan Military Academy since it began accepting them in 2006 during General Pervez Musharraf’s presidency.

Snapshot,
Elmira Bayrasli

In an election, coming in third place is rarely cause for celebration. But for Selahattin Demirtas, the charismatic and telegenic 41-year-old politician who ran in Turkey’s August 10 presidential election, it was. Nearly ten percent of Turkish voters cast their ballots for Demirtas, a Kurd.

Snapshot,
Lauren Carasik

In theory, Honduras' new charter cities are supposed to spur widespread economic growth by allowing free enterprise to circumvent the country’s weak political institutions. In practice, they seem likely to benefit only Honduras’ existing economic and political elites.

Letter From,
Madhu Narasimhan

In the 12 years since gaining independence, East Timor has struggled in almost every facet of economic and political management. As its neighboring economies boom, it is quietly on the path to becoming a failed state. And it is quickly running out of time to change course.

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