Strategy & Conflict

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Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

When U.S. President Barack Obama touches down in Asia later this month for a long-overdue trip, he will have a daunting challenge ahead of him: pushing Washington’s two major regional allies together.

Snapshot,
Gi-Wook Shin and Daniel C. Sneider

Disputes over wartime history between Japan and South Korea are proving a useful wedge for China to drive the two U.S. allies apart. As Obama heads to Asia this month, it is time for the United States to tackle wartime history in Asia head on.

Snapshot,
Jakob Mischke and Andreas Umland

Frank-Walter Steinmeier, Germany’s foreign minister, inherited a long German tradition of bracketing human rights concerns when dealing with Russia. But Steinmeier's forceful response to the Ukraine crisis signals that German foreign policy is entering a very new era.

Snapshot,
David Malet

Foreign fighters might seem like a product of twenty-first-century warfare, but they are nothing new. Over the past two centuries, more than 70 insurgencies have successfully gone transnational. The patterns of recruitment for such disparate groups are broadly similar and, because of that, their campaigns all have the same Achilles’ heel.

Snapshot,
Nancy Sherman

The recent shooting at Fort Hood should be seen as a warning to the U.S. military that guns and mental illness do not mix. It should not make Americans warier of returning service members in need.

Snapshot,
Alexander Kliment

Russian President Vladimir Putin has presented a bold new vision for Russia, one based on a resurgence of great power status. But Putin’s new national story has only set up Russians for disappointment and economic pain.

Essay,
Swanee Hunt

It would be obscene to say that the genocide in Rwanda had even the thinnest silver lining. But it did create a natural -- or unnatural -- experiment, as the country’s social, economic, and political institutions were wiped out. In important respects, the reconstructed Rwanda is a dramatically different country, especially for women.

Snapshot,
Elisabeth Brocking

The West has drastically misread the likely effect that international monitors will have in Ukraine. Monitors are far more likely to participate in a tacit partition than a peaceful reunification of Ukraine.

Postscript,
Alexander J. Motyl

To deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin, the West has to assume that he is rational and will respond to carrots and sticks. Accordingly, it should take him up on his proposal to form a working group on Ukraine, which would at least force everyone to take a deep breath and survey the situation with a measure of calm.

Snapshot,
Peter Liberman and Julie A. George

Russia’s moves in Crimea might have come as a shock, but for millennia, conquests and annexations were the meat and potatoes of state building and international politics. In general, they don't pay off for the conqueror. In this case, though, they might.

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