Peacekeeping

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Snapshot,
John Prendergast

Africa's bloodiest conflicts are not new, but they have never been more linked than they are today. Traditional peacemaking efforts have largely failed to grapple with that reality.

Snapshot,
Jeremy Shapiro and Samuel Charap

Yes, Geneva II will likely fail to produce a settlement to the Syrian conflict. But the crucial questions are how it fails and what happens after. If Washington plays its cards right, it can use a breakdown of negotiations to drive a wedge between Moscow and Assad.

Snapshot,
Frederic Wehrey

Even as Susan Rice laid out the Obama administration's plans for a more modest Middle East policy last month, the U.S. military was preparing to step up its assistance in Libya and help the country build a new army. With all the security, economic, and political problems that await, it might be time to consider doing even more.

Snapshot,
Anne Phillips

For a little under a year, the Colombian government and the FARC have been holding peace talks in Havana. Two Colombian government negotiators, a prominent opposition member of the Venezuelan National Assembly, a former Cuban diplomat, and two demobilized fighters offer their takes on the negotiations. Their hopefulness about the process varies, but all warn of regional instability should talks fail.

Snapshot,
David Kaye

The Obama administration has bolstered the International Criminal Court in an effort to prevent atrocities worldwide. Still, Congressional opposition and developments in conflicts abroad might make it hard for Washington to continue to cooperate with the court.

Snapshot,
Etienne de Durand

France's intervention in Mali has so far succeeded, but expelling Islamist militants was the easy part. Now Paris must turn its tactical achievements into a lasting victory -- which will require a light but enduring presence in the country.

Snapshot,
Sebastian Elischer

Although France quickly achieved its goals in Mali, the Islamist and Tuareg militants it fought are still at large, having swiftly retreated into the northeastern part of the country. The most likely outcome of the French operation, therefore, is not an end to West Africa's problems but their spread into neighboring Niger.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab and Andrew J. Tabler

After almost two years of bloodletting in Syria, there is little chance that negotiations of the kind UN peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi has been urging would end the conflict. More likely, they would prolong it. And worse, they would perpetuate Bashar al-Assad’s favorite strategy of fanning fears of rebel sectarianism and extremism to dissuade the world from intervening against him.

Snapshot,
Michael Bröning

For several sound reasons, Western decision-makers have up to now rejected the idea of comprehensively arming Syria's opposition. But the facts on the ground have increasingly overrun those arguments, and the case for arming the rebels grows stronger by the month.

Snapshot,
Peter Eichstaedt

Bans on conflict minerals mined in DRC were supposed to help pacify the region, which has been torn by fights over control of lucrative mines. Instead, they have made militias such as M23, which captured and then lost the eastern Congolese city of Goma this month, more desperate and violent.

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