War & Military Strategy

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Snapshot,
Vera Mironova, Loubna Mrie, Richard Nielsen, and Sam Whitt

Recent surveys conducted in Syria reveal that Islamist fighters are surprisingly supportive of democracy. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Clint Hinote

Cyberattackers, especially those sponsored by states, operate with virtual impunity. If that doesn’t change, cyberattacks will continue to increase in severity. To reverse the trend, the United States needs to establish deterrence in cyberspace.

Snapshot,
Robert A. Pape, Keven Ruby, and Vincent Bauer

The ongoing U.S. air campaign against ISIS succeeded in blunting the group's drive toward Kurdish and Shia territory. But it has failed to prevent ISIS' consolidation of control over the Sunni areas in Iraq and Syria. Here's how the United States can accomplish both.

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The Gulf Cooperation Council recently announced the creation of a joint military command among its six member nations that will respond to regional threats. This news is not revolutionary: every effort at Gulf military unity has ended in failure, to a greater or lesser degree.

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

China might seem like a winner in Russia’s clash with the West over Ukraine, but the conflict has not left Beijing unscathed.

Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

To date, three million Syrians have fled the war in their country. The exodus has now surpassed the Rwandan genocide as the largest refugee crisis since World War II.

Snapshot,
Michael D. Matthews

Science and technology have always been decisive factors in war. But psychology may have an even more important role to play, particularly in the types of conflicts increasingly common in the twenty-first century.

Snapshot,
Raphael Cohen and Gabriel Scheinmann

Washington's European allies are contributing far less to the war on ISIS than the 2011 campaign in Libya. With time, they will only grow weaker on the battlefield. 

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

Kurds have a right to take Turkey to task for its inaction in Kobani, just as Turks have a right to insist that Kurdish suffering in Syria does not give the PKK license to kill civilians or off-duty soldiers in Turkey.

Snapshot,
Steven Simon

Obama faces a tragic choice between restraint against ISIS to avoid entanglement in Syria’s civil war or full engagement against ISIS with an eye to regime change and the reconstruction and stabilization of a devastated country. After Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya, we have a rough idea of what such an effort would entail and of the elusiveness of lasting gains.

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