Terrorism

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Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Ilan Berman

In recent months, discussions of Russia have focused on the Kremlin’s ongoing aggression against Ukraine. But Wednesday's coordinated terrorist assault on Grozny should refocus global attention on a problem that Russia itself increasingly is confronting: radical Islam.

Snapshot,
Khalil al-Anani

On November 10, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, a militant movement that operates out of the northern Sinai Peninsula, pledged allegiance to ISIS. The new merger underscores just how unstable Egypt remains—and how the military government may be losing its grip.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Sambanis and Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl

The usual argument for partition is that, once ethnic or sectarian fighting gets too bloody, nobody can put Humpty Dumpty back together again. The argument seems intuitive, but it rests on a flawed premise.

Snapshot,
Louise Shelley

A key element of U.S. President Barack Obama’s strategy against ISIS has been striking at the oil fields seized by the group to undermine its finances. But ISIS is a diversified criminal business, and oil is only one of its several revenue streams. U.S. officials ignore that fact at their own peril.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

To take out al Shabab, one need look no further than charcoal. The United Nations has repeatedly called for countries in the region to disrupt the group’s trade in this environmentally destructive product, but, as the most recent Somalia UN Monitoring Group report revealed, such efforts have been lackluster. With its patience wearing thin, the UN has now taken matters into its own hands by approving a naval intervention.

Snapshot,
Gunes Murat Tezcur and Sabri Ciftci

The past few weeks have seen a wave of Muslims from all around the world joining the ranks of ISIS. Although most of the attention has been on those coming from the United States and Europe, the bulk of foreign fighters has actually come from places like Turkey, from which the flow of jihadists is particularly puzzling.

Snapshot,
Lionel Beehner

To justify possible attacks on ISIS in Syria, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry invoked the right to hot pursuit -- an old maritime precept. But using this rationale would put Washington on a slippery legal slope. 

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey has anticipated Assad’s downfall ever since protests first broke out in Syria in 2011. It has been disappointed at every turn, though, and now it is not only Assad who is in trouble but Turkey as well.

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