Terrorism

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Snapshot,
William McCants

Although Saudi Arabia’s dislike of Brotherhood political activities abroad is well known, for decades the kingdom has tolerated the local Saudi branch of the Brotherhood. Its sudden reversal is an expression of solidarity with its politically vulnerable allies in the region and a warning to Sunni Islamists to tread carefully.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Since 2011, FATF, the international body charged with developing policies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing, has had Turkey on its gray list of high-risk and non-cooperative jurisdictions. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Barak Mendelsohn

Disowning ISIS came at some cost of reputation for al Qaeda, but the group could no longer afford to keep an affiliate that subverted central command. In the weeks and months to come, the United States would be wise to use the continued rift to promote its own interests in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Matthew Levitt

The need to target Israel has always featured prominently in al Qaeda rhetoric, but it has rarely translated into actual missions. And that is what makes the group's recent foiled plot in Jerusalem, which was traced back to al Qaeda chief Ayman al-Zawahiri, so significant.

Snapshot,
Michael Doran, William McCants, and Clint Watts

The al Qaeda of yesterday is gone. What is left is a collection of many different splinter organizations, most with local agendas. The United States should treat each on a case-by-case basis, especially in Syria were two affiliates, the al-Nusra front and the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, are battling it out.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

With the ongoing carnage in Syria and gruesome bombings in Iraq, another explosion in the Middle East might hardly seem like news. But the importance of the blast that hit the Iranian embassy in Beirut should not be diminished. It could spell the beginning of the end for Hezbollah.

Snapshot,
William McCants

A civil war has broken out within al Qaeda, largely because its leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has tried to expand the movement too broadly. As al Qaeda affiliates open new fronts in the global jihad, they often disagree about who should call the shots.

Postscript,
Alexander Meleagrou-Hitchens

The recent al Shabab attack on a Nairobi mall might have come as a surprise to Western observers, but it should not have. In form and motivation, the attack mirrored several others in the last few years.

Snapshot,
Malcolm Beith

In reshaping the war on drugs to support the war on terrorism, the United States has found a better way to fight both.

Review Essay,
Jessica Stern

Most research presumes that suicide bombings are political acts. But a new film reminds that perpetrators may be motivated by psychological grievances even more than political ones.

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