WMD & Proliferation

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Essay, May/June 2014
Mohammad Javad Zarif

With the election of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, Tehran and Washington have a unique opportunity to chart a new course. Ongoing nuclear negotiations face no insurmountable barriers; the only requirements for success are good faith and political will.

Snapshot,
Dmitry Adamsky

In the coming months, Israel will work with other world powers to find a diplomatic solution to Iran's nuclear program even as it signals its military resolve. But dual strategy can be counterproductive if not managed properly.

Snapshot,
Ariel Ilan Roth

No one should assume that, with the signing of the recent nuclear deal with Iran, the threat of war has passed. Washington's diplomatic engagement with Tehran may, ironically, make Jerusalem more likely to attack now, because later could be too late.

Postscript,
Kimberly Ann Elliott
Review Essay, Jan/Feb 2014
Gregory D. Koblentz

Eric Schlosser’s Command and Control is really two books in one. The first is a techno-thriller, narrating a shocking nuclear accident in gripping detail. The second is more analytic, exploring the challenge at the heart of nuclear command-and-control systems: how to ensure that nuclear weapons are both reliable and safe.

Snapshot,
Zachary K. Goldman and Mira Rapp-Hooper

The recent nuclear agreement with Iran has spooked many of Washington’s most important allies in the Persian Gulf. The United States can and must allay their fears; any long-term resolution to the Iranian nuclear standoff will otherwise be difficult to sustain.

Snapshot,
Suzanne Maloney

The interim nuclear agreement has pulled the Iranian regime back from the edge of disaster. But that doesn't mean its problems are over. Having raised the expectations of a restless young nation with a popular moderate president and celebrated nuclear bargain, Tehran must now deliver even more.

Postscript,
Mohsen Milani

There is some basis to the argument that the deal with Iran has implicitly recognized the country as a threshold nuclear power. Here's why that isn't a problem.

Snapshot,
Stephen Kotkin

Could Iranian President Hassan Rouhani be another Mikhail Gorbachev -- a real reformer who opens his country’s political system and creates the space for détente with the United States and Europe? Maybe. Here are the signals to watch for.

Snapshot,
Kimberly Ann Elliott

As negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program resume in Geneva this week, U.S. policymakers are divided between those who would like to loosen the sanctions on Iran in exchange for Tehran's cooperation and those who would rather tighten them to force compliance. History suggests that sanctions make a better bargaining chip than bludgeon.

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