Security

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Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The Gulf Cooperation Council recently announced the creation of a joint military command among its six member nations that will respond to regional threats. This news is not revolutionary: every effort at Gulf military unity has ended in failure, to a greater or lesser degree.

Snapshot,
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Many have warned that even if a Iran accepts a nuclear deal, it will continue to develop nuclear weapons in secret. In reality, however, Iran simply doesn't have the capability to build the bomb without getting caught.

Snapshot,
Ilan Berman

In recent months, discussions of Russia have focused on the Kremlin’s ongoing aggression against Ukraine. But Wednesday's coordinated terrorist assault on Grozny should refocus global attention on a problem that Russia itself increasingly is confronting: radical Islam.

Snapshot,
Khalil al-Anani

On November 10, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, a militant movement that operates out of the northern Sinai Peninsula, pledged allegiance to ISIS. The new merger underscores just how unstable Egypt remains—and how the military government may be losing its grip.

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

China might seem like a winner in Russia’s clash with the West over Ukraine, but the conflict has not left Beijing unscathed.

Response, Jan/Feb 2015
Lawrence J. Korb; Rick Brennan

Korb argues that Iraqi politicians and American generals are to blame for the bungled withdrawal from Iraq. Brennan replies.

Snapshot,
Oula Abdulhamid Alrifai

Since the start of the Syrian conflict, the country’s Alawites have kept President Bashar al-Assad in power. But there are signs that he is now losing their support.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Sambanis and Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl

The usual argument for partition is that, once ethnic or sectarian fighting gets too bloody, nobody can put Humpty Dumpty back together again. The argument seems intuitive, but it rests on a flawed premise.

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