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Snapshot,
Stephen Holmes and Ivan Krastev

Russia's annexation of Crimea came with few consequences for Russia, while an accidental attack on a civilian airliner by semi-anarchical rebel forces, only loosely controlled by Moscow, may redefine the country's place in the world order. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

Qatar’s diplomatic intervention in Gaza has exposed the risks inherent in its broader grand strategy. Although Qatar’s foreign policy has not changed, it is no longer going to be able to pose as a neutral arbiter.

Snapshot,
Jason Pack

The violence tearing apart Libya might appear to be an ideological struggle. In fact, it is an economic competition between two rival criminal networks.

Snapshot,
Dalia Dassa Kaye

The longer the conflict in Gaza continues, the harder it will be to insulate the negotiations from other events in the region -- and that does not bode well for a successful outcome.

Snapshot,
Martin Welz and Angela Meyer

The history of the Central African Republic over the past 20 years is linked to a dizzying number of peacekeeping acronyms. The latest mission, to be led by the UN, seems fated to repeat mistakes of its predecessors.

Snapshot,
Ariel Ilan Roth

Israel's tactical achievements against Hamas can't be minimized. But they do not equal a strategic victory. War, as Clausewitz famously taught, is the continuation of politics by other means. Wars are fought to realign politics in a way that benefits the victor and is detrimental to the loser. But the Israelis have lost sight of this distinction.

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

This week saw a major escalation of Russian military involvement in Ukraine, which, until yesterday, had gone relatively unremarked in Western media. But now, no matter who fired the missile that brought down Malaysia Airlines flight 17, things are set to change. And that is bad news for Putin.

Snapshot,
Bassel F. Salloukh

The stunning recent military successes by ISIS have triggered a wave of gloomy prognoses about the demise of the Sykes-Picot regional order in the Levant. However, the stakes are higher than the disintegration of what have always been permeable borders and the collapse of a long bygone Anglo-French agreement. Indeed, this year could mark the birth of a new regional order.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti and Zack Gold

The similarities between this month’s hostilities between Hamas and Israel and those during their last major confrontation, in November 2012, are striking. Yet one thing has changed: the relationship between Hamas and Egypt.

Snapshot,
Matthew Levitt

Soon after three Israel teenagers were kidnapped last month, Israeli officials leaked to the press the name of the Hamas operational commander who is believed to be behind a recent surge in kidnapping plots. It was a familiar one for those who follow Hamas closely: Salah al-Arouri, a longtime Hamas operative from the West Bank, who now lives openly in Turkey. 

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