Security

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Snapshot,
William McCants

Although Saudi Arabia’s dislike of Brotherhood political activities abroad is well known, for decades the kingdom has tolerated the local Saudi branch of the Brotherhood. Its sudden reversal is an expression of solidarity with its politically vulnerable allies in the region and a warning to Sunni Islamists to tread carefully.

Snapshot,
Peter Liberman and Julie A. George

Russia’s moves in Crimea might have come as a shock, but for millennia, conquests and annexations were the meat and potatoes of state building and international politics. In general, they don't pay off for the conqueror. In this case, though, they might.

Snapshot,
John Prendergast

Africa's bloodiest conflicts are not new, but they have never been more linked than they are today. Traditional peacemaking efforts have largely failed to grapple with that reality.

Snapshot,
Patricio Asfura-Heim and Ralph H. Espach

In order to maximize the benefits and avoid the pitfalls associated with bringing vigilantes into the fold, the Mexican government should consider a few lessons from around the world.

Snapshot,
Jeffrey Sachs

The West has managed to rapidly integrate several countries that were once behind the Iron Curtain. But there is no precedent for quickly integrating a country like Ukraine. Without Russia, Ukraine would have no economic, financial, or cultural viability.

Snapshot,
Kathleen R. McNamara

The situation in Ukraine cuts to the heart of the EU's promise -- and challenges -- as a foreign policy actor. The union still has a powerful pull for many countries, but it is sorely limited in its ability to respond to crises. It might not be able to wrest Crimea forcibly from a determined Putin, for example, but its emphasis on human security and international law will have a stealthy impact on Ukraine's evolution for years to come.

Snapshot,
Ivan Krastev

It will be hard to counter Putin because he has refused to play by Western rules. He seems not to fear political isolation; he invites it. He seems not worry about the closing of borders; he hopes for it. His foreign policy amounts to a deep rejection of Europe and an attempt to draw a clear line between its world and Russia's.

Snapshot,
Kimberly Marten

When it comes to Russia and Ukraine, Western policymakers are most worried about two possible scenarios: First, that Russia would embargo gas to Ukraine, and second, that it would invade Ukraine’s Crimean peninsula. But neither is likely. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Since 2011, FATF, the international body charged with developing policies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing, has had Turkey on its gray list of high-risk and non-cooperative jurisdictions. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Barak Mendelsohn

Disowning ISIS came at some cost of reputation for al Qaeda, but the group could no longer afford to keep an affiliate that subverted central command. In the weeks and months to come, the United States would be wise to use the continued rift to promote its own interests in Iraq and Syria.

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