Security

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Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

If and when Russia becomes friendly toward the West, Ukraine’s strategic importance will fade. Until then, defending Ukraine’s interests—security, stability, prosperity, and democracy—is the best way to defend the West’s own.

Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Turkey has long supported the terrorist group al-Nusra as a way to pressure the Assad regime. But there is no evidence to suggest that Turkey ever gave support to ISIS, once its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, split from al-Nusra in 2013.

Snapshot,
Kelly M. Greenhill

In Nigeria, the dispute over the number of casualties inflicted by Boko Haram—especially with its latest attack in Baga—has grown particularly acute in the lead-up to the country's now postponed elections.

Snapshot,
Mia Bloom and John Horgan

The exploitation of children by terrorist groups is not new, but groups such as ISIS, Boko Haram, and the Pakistani Taliban are increasingly using children to carry out their strategies.

Snapshot,
Michael Pregent and Robin Simcox

The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) is starting to show some wear and tear. True, it has pulled off some gruesome executions, attracted jihadists from across the world, and still holds swaths of Iraq and Syria. But cracks are appearing in the self-styled Caliphate.

Letter From,
Kayhan Barzegar

U.S. President Barak Obama has set a difficult goal in the war against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). To achieve it, he will need to bring Iran on board, especially in the Syrian peace talks.

Snapshot,
David Schenker

If the past is precedent, Kasasbeh’s death at the hands of ISIS could signal a change—at least temporarily—in Jordanian popular attitudes toward the war and presage a more robust role for the kingdom in military operations.

Snapshot,
Seth Kaplan

Although the militant Islamist group Boko Haram has many features of a standard terrorist group, it is more helpful to consider it in another light: as a unique product of Nigeria’s unequal governance.

Snapshot,
Clint Watts

If al Qaeda were a corporation today, it would be a big name but an aging brand, one now strikingly out of touch with 18–35-year-olds.

Letter From,
Jérôme Tubiana

In South Sudan's latest war, where alliances are made and broken at dizzying speed, there is little evidence that the recent ceasefire agreement will actually end the fighting.

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