Security

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Snapshot,
Paul Hidalgo

The political upheaval and conflict in Kenya could not be better for the Islamist militant group al Shabaab. Its continued attacks have successfully pitted the country’s two top politicians against each other in a game of political brinkmanship that could plunge Kenya into a toxic ethnic conflict -- exactly the kind of environment in which a group like al Shabaab can thrive.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Mazarr

Recent events in Ukraine and Iraq portend a new era for international security. Today, the world’s major security risks stem from the wrath of societies or groups that feel alienated or left behind by the emerging liberal order.

Snapshot,
Steve Negus

A year after Egypt's military deposed President Mohamed Morsi, a new regime is finally starting to take shape. Sisi's charisma can ease his first few years in power, his credibility ultimately hinges on whether he can deliver security, services, and jobs.

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay

From Turkey’s perspective, Kurdish autonomy is starting to look like a good thing. The portions of northern Iraq and Syria that are under Kurdish control are stable and peaceful -- a perfect bulwark against threats such as the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). And that is why Turkey has been on good behavior with the Iraqi Kurds, is working on its relations with the Syrian Kurds, and might finally be breaking the impasse with the Kurds in its own territory.

Snapshot,
Robin Simcox

Virtually overnight, ISIS has gone from terrorist group to terrorist army. And it seems intent on attacking the West.

Snapshot,
Edward P. Joseph and Janusz Bugajski

To help contain Russia, Washington must use its influence to break the stalemate within Europe over NATO and EU expansion in the Balkans.

Snapshot,
Dalia Dassa Kaye

There is a tendency in the United States to believe that a loss for the West must be a gain for Iran. But, in Iraq, both sides are losing in the face of a common foe.

Snapshot,
Jennifer Lind

To protect its core interests in Asia, the United States should start being honest about the things it doesn't care about. That includes China's harassment of Philippine ships and its decision to fly aircraft over disputed islands.

Snapshot,
Andrew J. Tabler

Uprooting ISIS from the swath of territory it holds between Aleppo and Baghdad will take a lot more than airstrikes or a change of government in Iraq. To prevent ISIS from building a permanent safe haven in the region, Washington must help settle Syria.

Postscript,
Emma Sky

The United States has a key role to play in helping broker a new deal among Iraqi elites that creates a better balance among the country's various communities.

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