Security

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Snapshot,
Vera Mironova, Loubna Mrie, Richard Nielsen, and Sam Whitt

Recent surveys conducted in Syria reveal that Islamist fighters are surprisingly supportive of democracy. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Robin Simcox

Recent history has shown that there will always be a new jihadist cause. If it is not France’s involvement in Libya in 2011, then it is its invasion of Mali in January 2013; if it is not foreign policy, it is domestic; if it is not banning head scarves in public, it is drawing insulting cartoons. That is why, even as governments look to the recent attacks for lessons, they cannot allow them to dictate policies.

Snapshot,
Jytte Klausen

The death toll makes this week’s attack the most significant on French soil since the Nazi occupation—a huge milestone in al Qaeda’s campaign against the West.

Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

One of the U.S. legal advisors’ key justifications for the program was the “Israeli example," which, they argued, established that torture is permissible in some circumstances. Here's why the comparison is misleading.

Snapshot,
Deganit Paikowsky and Gil Baram

Space systems—the backbone of most corporate, military, communication, and even agricultural services—are increasingly threatened by vulnerabilities in cyberspace. The time is now ripe for an upgrade.

Snapshot,
Clint Hinote

Cyberattackers, especially those sponsored by states, operate with virtual impunity. If that doesn’t change, cyberattacks will continue to increase in severity. To reverse the trend, the United States needs to establish deterrence in cyberspace.

Snapshot,
Robert A. Pape, Keven Ruby, and Vincent Bauer

The ongoing U.S. air campaign against ISIS succeeded in blunting the group's drive toward Kurdish and Shia territory. But it has failed to prevent ISIS' consolidation of control over the Sunni areas in Iraq and Syria. Here's how the United States can accomplish both.

Snapshot,
Denise Garcia

The United Nations’ Arms Trade Treaty, which comes into force on Christmas Eve this year, will deal a major blow to illegal arms dealers that supply the weapons for a large portion of the world’s conflicts.

Snapshot,
Amjad Mahmood Khan

Pakistan's terrorism problem has its roots in a group of draconian laws—known as the blasphemy laws—that a military dictator, Zia ul-Haq, enacted decades ago.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

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