Security

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Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

Before the year is out, the world could witness Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shaking hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang.

Snapshot,
Vladislav Inozemtsev and Anton Barbashin

Neither the West nor Russia will benefit from further hostilities, but the Russian government appears unable to comprehend that fact. It thus falls to the West to make Russia an offer it can't refuse.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti

Over the past few weeks, any talk of Israel redeploying from the Gaza Strip has been met with public calls for continued military operations to defeat and disarm Hamas. But, these days, it seems that Israel is focusing on a more realistic exit strategy. That is a good thing.

Snapshot,
Joshua Yaffa

Vladimir Putin's decision to double down on his Ukraine policy in the face of Western sanctions will deepen Russia's isolation and hit the country's consumers. His bet is that he can weather the costs -- and preserve the loyalty of his supporters.

Snapshot,
Mark Perry

Most of Hamas’ rockets are incapable of inflicting mass civilian casualties, flattening apartment blocks, or causing conflagrations in Israel. The nature of the arsenal makes Israel’s military operation entirely counterproductive.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

Qatar’s diplomatic intervention in Gaza has exposed the risks inherent in its broader grand strategy. Although Qatar’s foreign policy has not changed, it is no longer going to be able to pose as a neutral arbiter.

Snapshot,
Stephen Holmes and Ivan Krastev

Russia's annexation of Crimea came with few consequences for Russia, while an accidental attack on a civilian airliner by semi-anarchical rebel forces, only loosely controlled by Moscow, may redefine the country's place in the world order. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Jason Pack

The violence tearing apart Libya might appear to be an ideological struggle. In fact, it is an economic competition between two rival criminal networks.

Snapshot,
Dalia Dassa Kaye

The longer the conflict in Gaza continues, the harder it will be to insulate the negotiations from other events in the region -- and that does not bode well for a successful outcome.

Snapshot,
Martin Welz and Angela Meyer

The history of the Central African Republic over the past 20 years is linked to a dizzying number of peacekeeping acronyms. The latest mission, to be led by the UN, seems fated to repeat mistakes of its predecessors.

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