Defense Policy

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Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.   

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

China might seem like a winner in Russia’s clash with the West over Ukraine, but the conflict has not left Beijing unscathed.

Response, Jan/Feb 2015
Lawrence J. Korb; Rick Brennan

Korb argues that Iraqi politicians and American generals are to blame for the bungled withdrawal from Iraq. Brennan replies.

Snapshot,
Raphael Cohen and Gabriel Scheinmann

Washington's European allies are contributing far less to the war on ISIS than the 2011 campaign in Libya. With time, they will only grow weaker on the battlefield. 

Snapshot,
Edward P. Joseph and Janusz Bugajski

To help contain Russia, Washington must use its influence to break the stalemate within Europe over NATO and EU expansion in the Balkans.

Snapshot,
Denise Garcia

Robots that are programmed to kill could soon escape science fiction and become reality. Given the strategic, moral, and legal questions that such killer robots raise, it is up to the United States to lead the international effort to ban them.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

No modern Arab country has succeeded in building and sustaining an indigenous national defense industry. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates are about to change that.

Comment, May/June 2014
Sharon E. Burke

The Defense Department is the United States’ largest energy consumer, but it’s also a major incubator of cutting-edge technologies. To cut fuel demands and meet new threats, the Pentagon is transforming the U.S. military from an organization that uses as much fuel as it can get to one that uses only as much as it needs.

Snapshot,
Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent

Hagel bills this year's proposed U.S. defense budget as a novelty. The New York Times portrays it as an antiquity. Senator Lindsey Graham paints it as a travesty. In truth, it is none of those things. Rather, the proposed budget represents a continuation of nearly three years of defense retrenchment, which is modest in scope and prudent in purpose.

Snapshot,
William J. Parker III

Lincoln Paine’s recent article “What’s a Navy For?” asks an important question, but his implication that the U.S. Navy does not have an answer is off course.

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