Domestic Politics

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Snapshot,
Richard Javad Heydarian

As president, Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III has managed to transform the Philippine economy and restore public trust in the state. Yet in recent months, the Aquino's political fortunes have taken a dramatic turn for the worse. 

Interview,
Julia Gillard

The former prime minister of Australia talks to Foreign Affairs about sexism, education, and her country's global role.

Snapshot,
Samantha Eyler

Sweden's Feminist Initiative party aims to put gender issues squarely at the top of Sweden's political agenda. By contrast, many U.S. feminists have turned the personal-is-political mantra of second-wave feminism on its head, taking a marked turn toward lifestyle issues, with a new focus on empowering women within the political and economic frameworks that already exist.

Snapshot,
Bo Rothstein

The days of Swedish exceptionalism are over. The country no longer has an exceptionally strong social democracy. Its level of inequality is no longer exceptionally low, and its level of public spending will no longer be exceptionally high. From now on, it will be closer to average.

Snapshot,
Mark Blyth

Scottish independence could lead to economic disaster. But debates over national independence are seldom rational. Younger Scots aren't thinking about costs and uncertainties so much as the idea that a different future is possible.

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay

Davutoglu’s foreign policy has dangerously exposed Turkey to regional threats, which will probably preoccupy him as he takes over the prime ministership.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Michael Tomasky

Divisions among Democrats exist just like they do among Republicans, but have largely festered beneath the surface for lack of a spokesperson to challenge the party’s economic elites. In Elizabeth Warren, grassroots Democrats may have found their champion.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Byron York

A loose confederation of conservative thinkers and politicians is developing a new strategy for reaching out to the American middle class. These reformers could save the Republican Party -- if only they could win over their fellow conservatives.  

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Gideon Rose and Jonathan Tepperman

American politics today are a mess, and since the distraction and paralysis of the world’s hegemon has such obvious global significance, we decided to turn our focus inward, exploring the sources and contours of the American malaise.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
David Frum

Three big trends -- a growing reliance on older voters, an extremist ideological turn, and an increasing internal rigidity -- have changed the Republican Party over the past decade, weakening its ability to win presidential elections and inhibiting its ability to govern.

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