Foreign Policy

Refine By:
Postscript,
Ananda Rose

Crossing the border between the United States and Mexico is more dangerous than ever. Here's what happens to those who make it -- and those who don't.

Letter From,
Dorn Townsend

Afghanistan seems to be holding its breath. Business has ground to a halt and middle-class Afghans are eyeing foreign escape routes as they send their money out of the country. The sense of uncertainly is not just about who will be the next president, or whether the loser will accept the result. It’s about the precarious economy.

Snapshot,
Jennifer Lind

To protect its core interests in Asia, the United States should start being honest about the things it doesn't care about. That includes China's harassment of Philippine ships and its decision to fly aircraft over disputed islands.

Postscript,
John Mueller

American foreign policy, routinely decorated with extravagant alarmism over the last dozen years or so, has been an abject failure. That is why it is a good thing that threat-inflation is becoming a harder sell when it comes to Iraq.

Comment, 2014
Stephen R. Weissman

Newly available evidence shows that the CIA engaged in pervasive political meddling and paramilitary action in Congo during the 1960s -- and that the local CIA station chief directly influenced the events that led to the death of Patrice Lumumba, the country's first democratically elected prime minister.

Comment, 2014
Ray Takeyh

Conventional wisdom about the 1953 coup in Iran rests on the myth that the CIA toppled the country's democratically elected prime minister. In reality, the coup was primarily a domestic Iranian affair, and the CIA's impact was ultimately insignificant.

Comment, 2014
Harold H. Saunders

In 1971, the Pakistani government orchestrated a brutal military crackdown against the Bengali population in East Pakistan -- while the United States stuck by its ally Pakistan. Gary Bass's new book spotlights the “significant complicity” of U.S. President Richard Nixon and his national security adviser, Henry Kissinger, in this “forgotten genocide.”

Essay, 2014
Alexander Lukin

U.S. and European officials need to understand how Russia really thinks about foreign policy. To resolve the Ukraine crisis and prevent similar ones from occurring in the future, they need to get better at putting themselves in Moscow’s shoes.

Essay, 2014
Marvin Ammori

As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama called himself “a strong supporter of net neutrality.” But under his leadership, the Federal Communications Commission appears to have given up on the goal of maintaining an open Internet. Obama now has second chance to fix his Internet policy; here’s what he should do.

Essay, 2014
Robert Legvold

The crisis in Ukraine has pushed Moscow and the West into a new Cold War. For both sides, the top priority must now be to contain the conflict, ensuring that it ends up being as short and as shallow as possible.

Syndicate content