Foreign Policy

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Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

Observers accuse Netanyahu of using his recent speech to the U.S. Congress to drum up support in the upcoming Israeli election. But even there, his talk will probably matter very little.

Snapshot,
Janine Davidson

The president’s second National Security Strategy articulates a belief in a peaceful, rules-based international order; it also reaffirms the fact that none of this can happen without the leadership of the United States.

Snapshot,
Lisa Goldman

Commentators are arguing about whether Netanyahu is damaging Israel’s security by alienating Obama. It seems unlikely that the White House will cut back on military aid or stop vetoing anti-Israel legislation at the UN.

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should arm Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Stephen Hadley and Paul Haenle

U.S. leaders should not dismiss Chinese President Xi Jinping’s proposal to build a “new type of major-country relations” out of hand if Xi is willing to remove the proposition's references to core interests.

Snapshot,
Van Jackson

Russia tends to make diplomatic overtures to North Korea whenever relations between Moscow and Washington sour. With U.S. strategy in Asia hanging in the balance, though, the repercussions of a stronger Russian-North Korean partnership could be different than ever before.

Snapshot,
Bates Gill and Tom Switzer

Australia now figures more prominently in U.S. foreign policy than at any time since 1942–45, when Australian combat troops served under General Douglas MacArthur and scores of U.S. air and naval bases and army camps were stationed Down Under.

Snapshot,
Peter Pomerantsev

The West's ability to counter the Kremlin's skillful propaganda is now a matter of global security. Here's how to do it.

Snapshot,
Jose W. Fernandez and Eric Lorber

Easing the U.S. embargo on Cuba will provide companies with immediate economic opportunities, so long as they are willing to bear the administrative and bureaucratic burdens of conducting business in a nation untouched by U.S. industry for 54 years.

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