Obama Administration

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Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey might seem like a confident rising power, but its leaders fear being abandoned by the West as much as ever. As it has in the past, the United States can push Turkey toward political reform by reminding Ankara that it has to live up to Western democratic standards if it wants to continue to enjoy the benefits of being counted as an ally.

Essay, May/June 2014
Kenneth M. Pollack and Ray Takeyh

The problems of the Middle East remain too deeply intertwined with U.S. national security and the American economy to ignore. Whatever it might prefer to do, the Obama administration can’t just walk away from the region, but has to take a greater interest in it.

Essay, May/June 2014
Kurt M. Campbell and Ely Ratner

Asia is going to command ever more attention and resources from the United States, thanks to the region’s growing prosperity and influence and the enormous challenges the region poses. The Obama administration’s pivot or rebalancing makes sense; the challenge now is giving it proper form, substance, and resources.

Essay, May/June 2014
Daniel Byman and Benjamin Wittes

Behind all the talk of reforming the National Security Agency lies the question of whether it can win back the public’s trust, or at least its acquiescence. U.S. policymakers and citizens need to weigh how much security and diplomatic advantage they are willing to forgo in return for greater restraint and transparency.

Snapshot,
Nancy Sherman

The recent shooting at Fort Hood should be seen as a warning to the U.S. military that guns and mental illness do not mix. It should not make Americans warier of returning service members in need.

Snapshot,
Lee S. Wolosky

Economic sanctions and visa bans seem like an appealing way to punish Putin, both because there aren’t any realistic military options for countering him and comprehensive economic sanctions have had remarkable success in recent years, including in Iran. Unfortunately, Iran-like sanctions are not politically feasible in this case, and half measures won't get the United States what it seeks.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

As a U.S. ally, Turkey has been lacking for some time. But it is only recently that the United States has started to voice its displeasure. If Turkey’s sudden about-face on a number of issues is any indication, the Obama administration should have made getting tougher with Turkey a priority long ago.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Sarah Kreps and Micah Zenko

Armed drones are starting to rule the skies, but the United States’ monopoly over their use is fading. The Obama administration should nurture a regime to limit drone proliferation, similar to efforts to control nuclear weapons and missiles.

Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Jonathan Alter

Whether the Obama administration’s bungled rollout of HealthCare.gov will permanently tarnish the administration’s legacy is unclear, but it certainly offers important -- and depressing -- insights into the president’s operating style and the administration’s culture.

Review Essay, Mar/Apr 2014
Jack Shafer

In his new book, Rahul Sagar asks when it is legitimate for a government official to disclose secrets. Although conventional, his answer is far too restrictive -- as the case of Edward Snowden shows.

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