Obama Administration

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Postscript,
Ananda Rose

Crossing the border between the United States and Mexico is more dangerous than ever. Here's what happens to those who make it -- and those who don't.

Postscript,
John Mueller

American foreign policy, routinely decorated with extravagant alarmism over the last dozen years or so, has been an abject failure. That is why it is a good thing that threat-inflation is becoming a harder sell when it comes to Iraq.

Essay, 2014
Marvin Ammori

As a presidential candidate, Barack Obama called himself “a strong supporter of net neutrality.” But under his leadership, the Federal Communications Commission appears to have given up on the goal of maintaining an open Internet. Obama now has second chance to fix his Internet policy; here’s what he should do.

Snapshot,
Michael O'Hanlon

U.S. President Obama -- increasingly accused of having a listless foreign policy that, in the eyes of some, made Russian President Vladimir Putin believe he could get away with stealing Crimea -- is doing much better on the world stage than his critics allow. But he does still have to address one significant problem.

Snapshot,
David Gordon and Jordan Schneider

If animosity between China and the Soviet Union defined U.S.-Russian-Chinese trilateral relations during the Cold War, today it is U.S.-Russian tensions that drive the triad’s dynamics. And that will put China in the driver's seat.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey might seem like a confident rising power, but its leaders fear being abandoned by the West as much as ever. As it has in the past, the United States can push Turkey toward political reform by reminding Ankara that it has to live up to Western democratic standards if it wants to continue to enjoy the benefits of being counted as an ally.

Essay, May/June 2014
Kurt M. Campbell and Ely Ratner

Asia is going to command ever more attention and resources from the United States, thanks to the region’s growing prosperity and influence and the enormous challenges the region poses. The Obama administration’s pivot or rebalancing makes sense; the challenge now is giving it proper form, substance, and resources.

Essay, May/June 2014
Kenneth M. Pollack and Ray Takeyh

The problems of the Middle East remain too deeply intertwined with U.S. national security and the American economy to ignore. Whatever it might prefer to do, the Obama administration can’t just walk away from the region, but has to take a greater interest in it.

Essay, May/June 2014
Daniel Byman and Benjamin Wittes

Behind all the talk of reforming the National Security Agency lies the question of whether it can win back the public’s trust, or at least its acquiescence. U.S. policymakers and citizens need to weigh how much security and diplomatic advantage they are willing to forgo in return for greater restraint and transparency.

Snapshot,
Nancy Sherman

The recent shooting at Fort Hood should be seen as a warning to the U.S. military that guns and mental illness do not mix. It should not make Americans warier of returning service members in need.

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