Govt. Institutions

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Snapshot,
Daniel E. Geer, Jr. and Peter L. Levin

Accusations of a serious breach of personal data at the nation's largest integrated hospital network ignore the harsh realities of cybercrime. Rather than expecting network defenses to protect it against every possible attack, the United States needs to learn to isolate different cybersecurity problems and focus on what matters and what is feasible.

Snapshot,
Michael E. O'Hanlon

Hillary Clinton has had a solid tenure as secretary of state. There have been plenty of accomplishments and no major failures, but nor has there been any world-historical Clinton Doctrine. More than anything else, her continued effort to create one might just lead her to the Oval Office.

Snapshot,
Lauren C. Bell

There is less consensus than many realize about the damage caused by increased use of the filibuster in the U.S. Senate. Ambiguity over what constitutes a bona fide filibuster has allowed both Democrats and Republicans to demagogue the problem over time, usually in order to suit their short-term partisan interests. Don't hold your breath waiting for effective reform.

Snapshot,
Frank Lavin

In 2001, Washington and Singapore prevented a major terrorist attack on the U.S. embassy in Singapore. Here's how they did it.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2012
Linda Robinson

With the rise of endless irregular wars playing out in the shadows, special operations have never been more important to U.S. national security. But policymakers and commanders focus too much on dramatic raids and high-tech drone strikes. They need to pay more attention to an even more important task these forces take on: training foreign troops.

Snapshot,
Todd Moss

Africa's thriving democracies and economies, and its alarming transnational security threats, make it more important than ever to the United States. Obama, however, has largely ignored the continent. Regardless of who wins in November, Washington cannot afford to continue on the president's current path.

Essay, Jul/Aug 2012
Alexander Benard

Unlike other economic powerhouses, the United States does little to help its own companies win business abroad, and that timidity has allowed China to devour market share in emerging economies. It is time for Washington to shed its hang-ups about lobbying on behalf of American firms and start taking commercial diplomacy seriously.

Snapshot,
Jennifer Sims

Since the Pentagon has an unparalleled global reach and specializes in logistics, and the CIA has deep ties with target countries, it makes sense to gain economies of scale through combined and complementary intelligence operations.

Essay, May/June 2012
Moisés Naím

Around the world, criminal organizations and governments are fusing to an unprecedented degree, blurring the distinction between national interests and what suits the gangsters. Mafia states enjoy the unhealthy advantages of their hybrid status: they’re as nimble as gangs and as well protected as governments, and thus more dangerous than either.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2011
Joseph M. Parent and Paul K. MacDonald

The United States can no longer afford a world-spanning foreign policy. Retrenchment -- cutting military spending, redefining foreign priorities, and shifting more of the defense burden to allies -- is the only sensible course. Luckily, that does not have to spell instability abroad. History shows that pausing to recharge national batteries can renew a dominant power’s international legitimacy.

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