U.S. Policy

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Snapshot,
Maria Popova

Given Ukraine's rule-of-law problems, it is not surprising that one of the Euromaidan protesters’ top demands was for legal reform. Nor is it surprising that the new government in Kiev has focused on clearing out the judiciary and emancipating it from its political subservience. But how it has gone about that will only make Ukraine's problems worse.

Postscript,
Keith Darden

For the first time since 1989, Europe is transforming. The primary protagonists, by most accounts, are Russia and the West. The bit of territory that they are clawing at -- Ukraine -- has largely been eclipsed. Yet inattention to Ukraine’s internal demons reflects a dangerous misreading of current events.

Snapshot,
Nancy Sherman

The recent shooting at Fort Hood should be seen as a warning to the U.S. military that guns and mental illness do not mix. It should not make Americans warier of returning service members in need.

Snapshot,
Manjari Chatterjee Miller

Observers may blanch at the prospect of a Prime Minister Narendra Modi, whom they fear would apply his Hindu nationalist beliefs to Indian foreign policy. But they should remember that, for the past five decades, Indian foreign policy has been broadly consistent and any changes had little to do with the prime minister’s political ideology.

Snapshot,
Lee S. Wolosky

Economic sanctions and visa bans seem like an appealing way to punish Putin, both because there aren’t any realistic military options for countering him and comprehensive economic sanctions have had remarkable success in recent years, including in Iran. Unfortunately, Iran-like sanctions are not politically feasible in this case, and half measures won't get the United States what it seeks.

Snapshot,
Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent

Hagel bills this year's proposed U.S. defense budget as a novelty. The New York Times portrays it as an antiquity. Senator Lindsey Graham paints it as a travesty. In truth, it is none of those things. Rather, the proposed budget represents a continuation of nearly three years of defense retrenchment, which is modest in scope and prudent in purpose.

Snapshot,
William J. Parker III

Lincoln Paine’s recent article “What’s a Navy For?” asks an important question, but his implication that the U.S. Navy does not have an answer is off course.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

As a U.S. ally, Turkey has been lacking for some time. But it is only recently that the United States has started to voice its displeasure. If Turkey’s sudden about-face on a number of issues is any indication, the Obama administration should have made getting tougher with Turkey a priority long ago.

Essay, 2014
Sarah Kreps and Micah Zenko

Armed drones are starting to rule the skies, but the United States’ monopoly over their use is fading. The Obama administration should nurture a regime to limit drone proliferation, similar to efforts to control nuclear weapons and missiles.

Essay, 2014
Jonathan Alter

Whether the Obama administration’s bungled rollout of HealthCare.gov will permanently tarnish the administration’s legacy is unclear, but it certainly offers important -- and depressing -- insights into the president’s operating style and the administration’s culture.

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