U.S. Policy

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Snapshot,
Michael O'Hanlon

After containing ISIS with air strikes, the United States will need to consider what comes next. And here, Obama must be fair to his critics and avoid suggesting that those in favor of doing more want to return to the Iraq mission of 2003–2011. In fact, there are many options in between an all-out use of U.S. combat forces and the limited measures employed in recent days.

Snapshot,
Elmira Bayrasli

In an election, coming in third place is rarely cause for celebration. But for Selahattin Demirtas, the charismatic and telegenic 41-year-old politician who ran in Turkey’s August 10 presidential election, it was. Nearly ten percent of Turkish voters cast their ballots for Demirtas, a Kurd.

Snapshot,
Claire Sadar and Brent E. Sasley

Given his imperious attitude, Erdogan is often compared to Ataturk. But Erdogan has something Ataturk did not, namely the near-complete loyalty of his party, which provides a ready mechanism for setting policy. In that, another Turkish political figure offers an even better point of comparison: Turgut Ozal.

Snapshot,
Reidar Visser

Obama has declared that he does not want to be dragged into another Iraq war. But it is not like this war came from nowhere. It is, in fact, the same one that he tried to finish in 2010 and 2011 by papering over glaring holes in the Iraqi government and then leaving.

Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

Before the year is out, the world could witness Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shaking hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang.

Snapshot,
Steven Simon

Air strikes in Iraq might be necessary for the narrow purposes stipulated by Obama. But they will have a wide range of unintended consequences -- some relatively manageable, others less so.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Erdogan will likely win this weekend's presidential election. But the foundations of his power are unstable. His policies will eventually put him at odds with some of his most important backers: Istanbul-based big business and the religiously conservative business community in Turkey’s heartland, Anatolia. Indeed, they already have.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Michael Kazin

Why are gay rights advancing while organized labor retreats? Because of a long-term trend in which the American left has largely succeeded in pushing its social agenda but not its economic one.

Snapshot,
Deborah M. Lehr and Leigh Wedell

In early June, Chinese president Xi Jinping deployed eight SWAT-like inspection teams across China to ensure that local officials were meeting his new environmental targets. The teams submitted a 1,000-page report with a simple conclusion: local leaders, looking out for their own financial interests, were consistently ignoring directives from Beijing.

Snapshot,
Jan-Werner Müller

The Europe of today is a creation of Christian Democrats. Yet both as a set of ideas and as a political movement, Christian democracy is growing less influential and less coherent. As the larger project of European integration faces new risks, then, its most important backer may soon prove incapable of defending it. 

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