Topics

Economics

Snapshot,
David Gordon and Thomas Wright

Greece's new leaders have effectively united Europe against them. To repair the damage and keep the country's economy afloat, they need to rethink their message and adjust their demands.

Snapshot,
Nikolay Anguelov

Nearly two years after the United States lifted its economic sanctions on Naypyidaw, the ruling military regime has stalled reforms. And worst yet, members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations don't seem to mind.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Roughly $1.3 billion in remittances flow to Somalia every year. But heavy-handed regulation threatens to cut off this vital flow of money.

Environment

Snapshot,
Ira Trivedi

India’s environmental crisis is not just endangering human lives, but is also holding back the country’s economy. For Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, this story isn’t new.

Snapshot,
Scott Moore

China and the United States were once the greatest barriers to a comprehensive global climate agreement. No longer: India is now the last stumbling block standing in the way. It's still possible, however, to get New Delhi on board. Washingtion just needs to offer the right incentives.

Postscript,
Carter Roberts

Earth Overshoot Day is the date on which humanity’s demand for natural resources exceeds the earth’s ability to renew them in a year. Last year, we hit that mark on August 20. This year, it comes one day earlier. For the remainder of 2014, in other words, we will be living beyond our planet’s means.

Security

Snapshot,
Jennifer R. Williams

Climate change, intellectual property rights, and how to deal with spoiled teenagers. These are some of the more bizarre things that vexed al Qaeda in Osama bin Laden’s final months.

Snapshot,
Marlene Laruelle

Washington's latest sanctions have missed the mark. Targeting an ideologue such as Alexander Dugin will do little to punish Russia for its crimes against Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Asher Orkaby

The Houthis are one of the most effective military forces combating the expansion of al Qaeda and ISIS in the Arabian Peninsula. If the West turns its back on the Houthi leadership because of antagonistic slogans, opportunistic relations with Iran, or Hadi’s protestations, it might end up forsaking a serious partner.

Law & Institutions

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Snapshot,
Stewart Patrick and Naomi Egel

The OECD's approach to bringing in emerging powers as "key partners" is a smart way to remain relevant in a quickly shifting global landscape. Other multilateral organizations should pay attention. 

Snapshot,
Sarah E. Mendelson

Government harassment of independent organizations is as old as the state system itself, but recent intimidation campaigns have a twenty-first-century twist.

Politics & Society

Snapshot,
Daniel Kurtzer

The ultimate victory in Israeli elections belongs not to Netanyahu but to the country's right wing. The results showed that this force has become a permanent majority—a strength that comes regardless of who leads it.

Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

As the post-election dust settles in Israel, it has grown clear how long-standing cultural and political shifts shaped this year’s vote. 

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Christopher Tunnard, and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi

Estonia is the gold standard when it comes to digital innovation. The question is: How does the rest of the world catch up?

U.S. Policy

Snapshot,
Daniel Kurtzer

The ultimate victory in Israeli elections belongs not to Netanyahu but to the country's right wing. The results showed that this force has become a permanent majority—a strength that comes regardless of who leads it.

Snapshot,
Sumit Ganguly

Despite Modi’s best efforts, domestic developments in India threaten to jeopardize his foreign policy initiatives. He courts foreign leaders with grace, projecting professional cosmopolitanism, but his government has encouraged a dangerous, parochial social agenda at home.

Snapshot,
Adam P. Liff and Andrew S. Erickson

Since September 2012, the waters and airspace surrounding the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea have become increasingly crowded. China is conducting more military and paramilitary operations, and Japan is scrambling fighter jets daily. The risk of an unintended low-level incident escalating to a crisis has reached new heights. Given this reality, the two sides urgently need effective bilateral crisis management mechanisms.