Topics

Economics

Snapshot,
Edoardo Campanella

As they struggle to save the continent’s common currency from ruin, European policymakers must also confront what could be an even bigger economic problem. Europe’s economy is on the brink of a catastrophic skills shortage.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Spiro

Fed policy is once again revealing which emerging markets have strengthened their defenses against a tightening in U.S. monetary policy and which remain vulnerable. For its part, Turkey is firmly in the latter camp.

Snapshot,
Alan Greenspan

In today's world of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates, a return to the gold standard seems to be nowhere on anybody’s horizon. Yet gold still has special properties that no other currency can claim -- which is why China is boosting its holdings.

Environment

Postscript,
Carter Roberts

Earth Overshoot Day is the date on which humanity’s demand for natural resources exceeds the earth’s ability to renew them in a year. Last year, we hit that mark on August 20. This year, it comes one day earlier. For the remainder of 2014, in other words, we will be living beyond our planet’s means.

Snapshot,
Pete Ogden

Thanks to a newly proposed pollution rule, the United States is finally on its way toward meeting its Copenhagen emission reduction commitments. The move comes at the perfect time: At the end of next year, global leaders will convene in Paris to conclude the next major round of climate negotiations.

Snapshot,
Sulmaan Khan

On the grasslands of the Tibetan plateau, one sometimes hears a strange chattering -- an excited buzz that seems to emanate from the earth itself. Anyone who stops to look for the source will quickly realize that the ground is marked by a series of holes, from which small, shy creatures are likely to be watching. The labyrinthine burrows made by these mammals, called pikas, provide them security. But they also ensure China's water supply. Here's what their plight says about Chinese conservation efforts.

Security

Snapshot,
Dennis Ross

A comprehensive deal is the least likely outcome to emerge from the Iranian nuclear talks before the November 24 deadline. It would be to both sides' advantage to find a way to muddle through by avoiding any formalized agreement or extension.

Snapshot,
Lionel Beehner

To justify possible attacks on ISIS in Syria, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry invoked the right to hot pursuit -- an old maritime precept. But using this rationale would put Washington on a slippery legal slope. 

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey has anticipated Assad’s downfall ever since protests first broke out in Syria in 2011. It has been disappointed at every turn, though, and now it is not only Assad who is in trouble but Turkey as well.

Law & Institutions

Snapshot,
Lauren Carasik

Companies are increasingly using international arbitration tribunals for disputes involving extractive industries in the developing world. By circumventing the state’s domestic laws, this system of dispute resolution grants policymaking control to foreign tribunals, undercutting a state’s right to regulate labor, keep its citizens healthy, and protect its environment.

Snapshot,
Sarah E. Mendelson

With the MDGs coming to an end in 2015, the international community is now close to agreeing to what comes next. And here, there is some good news for those working to end trafficking. In several places, the draft goals explicitly and implicitly address combating human trafficking and ending modern slavery.

Snapshot,
Betcy Jose

As the reaction to the death of al Shabab leader Ahmed Abdi Godane has shown, open condemnation of targeted killings as violations of international law has slowly given way to silence. Here's why.

Politics & Society

Snapshot,
Fran Quigley

The two deadliest outbreaks of this century--cholera and Ebola--can be traced to one thing: poverty

Snapshot,
Andrew Hammond

UKIP’s by-election victory and last month's Scottish referendum may seem unrelated. But they both reflect a change in British politics: a relatively stable two-party system is giving way to more unpredictability.

Snapshot,
Adam Rasmi

Most Lebanese Jews left their homeland in the twentieth century. But some Lebanese are now hoping this trend can be reversed -- and there may be cause for optimism.

U.S. Policy

Snapshot,
Richard Javad Heydarian

As president, Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III has managed to transform the Philippine economy and restore public trust in the state. Yet in recent months, the Aquino's political fortunes have taken a dramatic turn for the worse. 

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The fate of the Middle East, home to roughly seven million Indians, has long been tied to that of India. Despite its stake in the region, however, India has remained passive in the face of crises. It appears wary of taking on a more assertive diplomatic or military role -- more likely to evacuate citizens than to send more in to grapple with the Middle East’s problems.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Spiro

Fed policy is once again revealing which emerging markets have strengthened their defenses against a tightening in U.S. monetary policy and which remain vulnerable. For its part, Turkey is firmly in the latter camp.