Topics

Economics

Snapshot,
Jim Krane

The Gulf monarchies have developed a growing taste for their chief export, one that could undermine both of their long-held roles: as global suppliers and as stable polities in an otherwise fractious Middle East.

Snapshot,
Daniel Cloud

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state. 

Comment, Jan/Feb 2015
Gideon Rose

Entrepreneurs drive innovation and dynamism, which in turn drive growth. So our lead package explores entrepreneurialism today—what it involves, what it accomplishes, and what can be done to spur and profit from it.

Environment

Snapshot,
Scott Moore

China and the United States were once the greatest barriers to a comprehensive global climate agreement. No longer: India is now the last stumbling block standing in the way. It's still possible, however, to get New Delhi on board. Washingtion just needs to offer the right incentives.

Postscript,
Carter Roberts

Earth Overshoot Day is the date on which humanity’s demand for natural resources exceeds the earth’s ability to renew them in a year. Last year, we hit that mark on August 20. This year, it comes one day earlier. For the remainder of 2014, in other words, we will be living beyond our planet’s means.

Snapshot,
Pete Ogden

Thanks to a newly proposed pollution rule, the United States is finally on its way toward meeting its Copenhagen emission reduction commitments. The move comes at the perfect time: At the end of next year, global leaders will convene in Paris to conclude the next major round of climate negotiations.

Security

Snapshot,
Denise Garcia

The United Nations’ Arms Trade Treaty, which comes into force on Christmas Eve this year, will deal a major blow to illegal arms dealers that supply the weapons for a large portion of the world’s conflicts.

Snapshot,
Amjad Mahmood Khan

Pakistan's terrorism problem has its roots in a group of draconian laws—known as the blasphemy laws—that a military dictator, Zia ul-Haq, enacted decades ago.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Law & Institutions

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Tomorrow, the French National Assembly is set to vote on a resolution recognizing a Palestinian state. Although the act would be nonbinding, the vote is a referendum on whether France can follow through on its claim as the West's truest champion of the Palestinian cause.

Politics & Society

Snapshot,
Marina Ottaway

After three years of battles in the streets, in the National Constituent Assembly, and at the ballot box, Tunisia has officially completed its formal transition to democracy.

Postscript,
Michael J. Bustamante

The agreement reached between the Obama administration and the Cuban government is by any measure historic, necessary, and overdue. Yet as the diplomatic rubber hits the road and Cuba continues its precarious transition to a mixed economy, old disputes may take on new forms.

Snapshot,
Amjad Mahmood Khan

Pakistan's terrorism problem has its roots in a group of draconian laws—known as the blasphemy laws—that a military dictator, Zia ul-Haq, enacted decades ago.

U.S. Policy

Snapshot,
Marina Ottaway

After three years of battles in the streets, in the National Constituent Assembly, and at the ballot box, Tunisia has officially completed its formal transition to democracy.

Snapshot,
Denise Garcia

The United Nations’ Arms Trade Treaty, which comes into force on Christmas Eve this year, will deal a major blow to illegal arms dealers that supply the weapons for a large portion of the world’s conflicts.

Postscript,
Michael J. Bustamante

The agreement reached between the Obama administration and the Cuban government is by any measure historic, necessary, and overdue. Yet as the diplomatic rubber hits the road and Cuba continues its precarious transition to a mixed economy, old disputes may take on new forms.