Topics

Economics

Letter From,
Javier Alvarez

The Liberian government and international organizations have been most focused on containing Ebola, as they should be. The containment policies, however, have come with unintended economic consequences that need to be addressed to avert an even worse crisis.

Snapshot,
Dag Detter and Stefan Fölster

Most governments know much about their debt but little about their assets. If central governments managed their assets better, they could generate annual returns of roughly $3 trillion—more than the world’s yearly investment in infrastructure including transportation, power, water, and telecommunications.

Snapshot,
Matthew Goodman and Ely Ratner

Nearly two centuries after it lost its traditional place at the center of Asian affairs, Beijing has begun giving shape and substance to its renewed leadership on the regional stage.

Environment

Snapshot,
Scott Moore

China and the United States were once the greatest barriers to a comprehensive global climate agreement. No longer: India is now the last stumbling block standing in the way. It's still possible, however, to get New Delhi on board. Washingtion just needs to offer the right incentives.

Postscript,
Carter Roberts

Earth Overshoot Day is the date on which humanity’s demand for natural resources exceeds the earth’s ability to renew them in a year. Last year, we hit that mark on August 20. This year, it comes one day earlier. For the remainder of 2014, in other words, we will be living beyond our planet’s means.

Snapshot,
Pete Ogden

Thanks to a newly proposed pollution rule, the United States is finally on its way toward meeting its Copenhagen emission reduction commitments. The move comes at the perfect time: At the end of next year, global leaders will convene in Paris to conclude the next major round of climate negotiations.

Security

Snapshot,
Peter D. Feaver and Eric Lorber

As the deadline for reaching a nuclear deal with Iran is pushed once again, observers remain focused on the agreement itself. But the signing would be just the first step on a long road toward ensuring that any accord actually survives. 

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

To take out al Shabab, one need look no further than charcoal. The United Nations has repeatedly called for countries in the region to disrupt the group’s trade in this environmentally destructive product, but, as the most recent Somalia UN Monitoring Group report revealed, such efforts have been lackluster. With its patience wearing thin, the UN has now taken matters into its own hands by approving a naval intervention.

Snapshot,
Sigurd Neubauer

As Iran moves closer to receiving international recognition for its nuclear program, Saudi Arabi's nuclear aspirations seem to have stalled completely. Fortunately, there are steps that the United States can take to push its nuclear talks with Saudi Arabia out of their rut.

Law & Institutions

Snapshot,
Matthew Goodman and Ely Ratner

Nearly two centuries after it lost its traditional place at the center of Asian affairs, Beijing has begun giving shape and substance to its renewed leadership on the regional stage.

Snapshot,
Rebecca M. Aragon and Jean M. Flannery

Foreign sovereign employers often assume that they are immune from U.S. court jurisdiction. That isn't exactly true, and believing it could be a costly mistake.

Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

To date, three million Syrians have fled the war in their country. The exodus has now surpassed the Rwandan genocide as the largest refugee crisis since World War II.

Politics & Society

Letter From,
Javier Alvarez

The Liberian government and international organizations have been most focused on containing Ebola, as they should be. The containment policies, however, have come with unintended economic consequences that need to be addressed to avert an even worse crisis.

Snapshot,
Ralph H. Espach

The Peña Nieto government seems to be facing its worst crisis yet, one likely to persist as police clash with a small minority of protestors who attack property, set fires, and throw Molotov cocktails. The breadth of the public outrage, however, is uncertain, and the movement has no clearly defined, practical demands.

Snapshot,
Jed Ober

Afghanistan's new unity government is not a step forward in the country's political development. Without deeper reforms, the temporary measure will only worsen the country's democratic malaise.  

U.S. Policy

Snapshot,
Jed Ober

Afghanistan's new unity government is not a step forward in the country's political development. Without deeper reforms, the temporary measure will only worsen the country's democratic malaise.  

Postscript,
Marvin Ammori

Last week, Obama finally stepped up to the plate, releasing a video and a detailed plan calling on the FCC to adopt the “the strongest possible rules to protect net neutrality.” It was the most accurate, well-informed, and important statement ever issued by a public official on the topic of Internet freedom.

Snapshot,
Rebecca M. Aragon and Jean M. Flannery

Foreign sovereign employers often assume that they are immune from U.S. court jurisdiction. That isn't exactly true, and believing it could be a costly mistake.