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Economics
News Release
Mar 31, 2020
The Comeback Nation
How U.S. economic supremacy has proved declinists wrong
Military Budgets
News Release
Feb 11, 2020
Come Home, America?
The United States is questioning the global role it once embraced. As many want to shed the burden of international commitments, Foreign Affairs asks: “Is it time for America to come home?”
U.S. Foreign Policy
News Release
Oct 15, 2019
Inside Trump’s Middle East
Foreign Affairs lead package “Trump’s Middle East” looks inside the decisions that have moved the region to the brink of war. “These articles offer a clear window onto the Middle East’s stark new land­scape,” writes Gideon Rose, Editor of Foreign Affairs, in his introduction to the package. “Read them and weep.”
Politics & Society
News Release
Apr 16, 2019
Searching for a Strategy After Trump
“This package has the feel of an intervention—a group attempt to deliver a sobering message to someone in real trouble who refuses to admit it,” writes Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the May/June lead package, which focuses on how U.S. foreign policy can regain its footing after the Trump era. “Interventions are never pleasant. But sometimes the message gets through. And the first step is acknowledging the problem.”  
U.S. Foreign Policy
News Release
Feb 12, 2019
Examining the New Faces of Nationalism
“Nationalism … drove some of the greatest crimes in history, and so the concept became taboo in polite society, in hopes that it might become taboo in practice, as well,” writes Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the March/April lead package. “Yet now it has come back with a vengeance. Nationalism’s largely unpredicted resurgence is sobering. But these essays left me hopeful, because they show a way out.”
Economics
News Release
Jan 28, 2019
Furman and Summers Argue Policymakers Should Focus on Investment, Not Debt
As the United States’ annual budget deficit approaches nearly $1 trillion this year, former Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisers Jason Furman and former U.S. Treasury Secretary Lawrence H. Summers argue in a pre-released essay from the March/April issue of Foreign Affairs, that “It’s time for Washington to put away its debt obsession” and focus on “worthwhile investments in such areas as education, health care, and infrastructure.”
Security
News Release
Dec 11, 2018
Who Will Run the World?
“Two decades ago, the U.S.-sponsored liberal international order seemed to be going from strength to strength. Now, both order and sponsor are in crisis, and the future is up for grabs,” writes Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the January/February lead package, which considers the range of possibilities for the world order in the coming years. “We’ve focused on how the troubled hegemon [the United States] and the confident challenger [China] are trying to write the story’s next chapter.”
Security
News Release
Oct 16, 2018
Do Nuclear Weapons Still Matter?
Every year, world powers spend vast sums maintaining nuclear arsenals and preventing their spread to other nations—notably, North Korea and Iran. Nuclear weapons dominate headlines and could blow up the world in a flash. Yet nuclear weapons haven’t been used since World War II. Nuclear weapons are discussed almost exclusively by specialists on separate tracks from the rest of foreign policy agendas. The November/December 2018 issue of Foreign Affairs explores whether or not nuclear weapons really matter, and if they do, why and how they affect the world.
Intelligence
News Release
Aug 14, 2018
World War Web: The Fight for the Internet’s Future
“The last few decades have witnessed the growth of an American-sponsored Internet open to all, and that has helped tie the world together, bringing wide-ranging benefits to billions. But that was then; conditions have changed,” writes Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the September/October issue of Foreign Affairs. “Whatever emerges from this melee, it will be different from, and in many ways worse than, what we have now.”
Politics & Society
News Release
Apr 17, 2018
A Global Report on the Decline of Democracy
“Centralization of power in the executive, politicization of the judiciary, attacks on indepen­dent media, the use of public office for private gain—the signs of democratic regression are well known. The only surprising thing is where they’ve turned up,” writes Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the May/June issue of Foreign Affairs. 
News Release
Apr 02, 2018
Pre-release: The Right Way to Coerce North Korea While Avoiding War
“When it comes to North Korea, U.S. President Donald Trump’s policies have been whiplash inducing,” write Georgetown University Professor Victor Cha and Center for Strategic and International Studies’ Fellow Katrin Fraser Katz in a pre-released essay from the May/June issue of Foreign Affairs.
News Release
Mar 19, 2018
Pre-release: Understanding the Schemes and Dreams of Saudi Arabia’s Next King
As Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (known as MBS) kicks off his visit to the United States this week, what can we make of his attempts to remake the kingdom’s economy and social life—from last November’s arrests of hundreds of elites on corruption charges, to diversifying the Saudi economy and reducing its dependence on oil, to allowing women to drive?
Economics
News Release
Feb 13, 2018
Walking Away From World Order: Weighing Trump’s First Year of Foreign Policy
“Nobody really knew what to expect when Donald Trump became U.S. president. Would he disrupt the status quo or maintain it? Blow himself up or escape unscathed? One year in, the answer is yes,” writes Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the March/April issue of Foreign Affairs.
News Release
Jan 05, 2018
Editors Select the Best of 2017: Review the Past to Prepare for the Future
Foreign Affairs’newest anthology looks back on the most remarkable events of 2017, from the new U.S. administration and combating fake news, to North Korea’s nuclear ambitions and China’s party elections. The anthology gathers highlights from Foreign Affairs in print and online throughout the past year in order to help readers prepare for the future.
News Release
Dec 12, 2017
Living With the Undead Past and National Sins, in the New Foreign Affairs
“How do nations handle the sins of the fathers and mothers? Take genocide, or slavery, or political mass murder. After such knowledge, what forgiveness—and what way forward?” asks Editor Gideon Rose in his introduction to the January/February issue of Foreign Affairs.
News Release
Nov 28, 2017
Foreign Affairs Introduces Student Sponsorship Program
On Giving Tuesday (November 28), Foreign Affairs magazine, the world’s leading forum for serious discussion of global issues, kicks off a new program that enables its readers to share their enthusiasm by donating access to the magazine to schools across the country and around the world.
Energy
News Release
Nov 16, 2017
America’s Energy Future Could Be Nuclear, Argues Varun Sivaram in Foreign Affairs
This week, as the United Nations convened climate change negotiations in Bonn, Germany, President Donald J. Trump’s envoys hosted an event promoting fossil fuels. Lost in the ensuing furor among the representatives gathered in Bonn was the U.S. delegation’s support of nuclear power. Council on Foreign Relations Fellow Varun Sivaram and Research Associate Madison Freeman argue in Foreign Affairs that “the administration should withdraw its botched proposal to subsidize both coal and nuclear and instead pursue a thoughtful strategy to foster a domestic nuclear renaissance.”
News Release
Nov 10, 2017
Why China Will Avoid Real Compromise With Trump, in Foreign Affairs
In his visit to Beijing this week, President Donald J. Trump is meeting his counterpart, Xi Jinping, “at the apex of his own political power and contemplating a status quo in Asia increasingly tilted in China’s favor,” writes Yale Law School’s Mira Rapp-Hooper in Foreign Affairs. “Since last November, China has succeeded in appearing to more and more of Asia as the steady, stable great power alongside an unpredictable and undependable United States.”
News Release
Nov 08, 2017
How Blockchain Can Cut Health Care Waste and Reduce Fraud, in Foreign Affairs
“Every year, some $455 billion of the world’s health care spending is lost to fraud,” write Harvard Medical School’s John G. Meara, Salim Afshar, Alex Peters, and Brian M. Till in Foreign Affairs. However, they argue, blockchain technology—which underpins Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies—could cut waste, reduce fraud, and bring better care to billions by “allowing donors to track money, goods, and treatment in real time.”