Despite his earlier threat of a veto, President Barack Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) of 2012 into law on the last day of 2011. The bill, which was sponsored by Senators Carl Levin (D-Mich.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.), had bipartisan support, passing in the Senate by 86 to 13 with one abstaining. The vote reflected the determination of Congress to confirm the president's authority to detain terrorists already in military custody, prevent their being transferred from Guantánamo to federal prisons on the U.S. mainland, and increase the role of the military in future counterterrorist efforts.

But the law has

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  • BRIAN MICHAEL JENKINS initiated the RAND Corporation’s research program on terrorism in 1972 and currently serves as Senior Adviser to the President of RAND. His latest book is The Long Shadow of 9/11: America’s Response to Terrorism.
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