with the assistance of William Diebold, Jr., Economics; Fritz Stern, Western Europe; Howard Linton, Asia; Richard H. Nolte, Middle East, North Africa; Joseph A. Ellis, Latin America; Edward Scfaumacher, Africa.

General: Political and Legal

THE SPRINGTIME OF FREEDOM: EVOLUTION OF DEVELOPING SOCIETIES. BY WILLIAM MCCORD. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 330 p. $6.00 (Paper, $2.25).

A discussion of the political and social problems in the new nations, in which the author takes issue with the view that "political tyranny and economic centralization" are the only paths. He hopes for a pluralistic program and the growth of freedom.

TRENDS IN WORLD POLITICS. BY BRUCE M. RUSSETT. New York: Macmillan, 1965, 156 p. $1.50 (Paper).

A concise account of changes in the international political system, particularly since 1945, together with an introduction to some of the newer empirical techniques for the study of international relations. For the future he sees a trend away from the bipolarity of recent decades.

THE WESTERN ALLIANCE: ITS STATUS AND PROSPECTS. EDITED BY EDGAR S. FURNISS, JR. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1965, 182 p. $4.75.

A collection of papers prepared for colloquia at Ohio State University and dealing with a number of problems relative to NATO-its military features, the role of certain members and its prospects.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS: A GENERAL THEORY. BY J. W. BURTON. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1965, 288 p. $7.50.

In this significant work, a Senior Lecturer in International Relations at University College, London, offers a critique of orthodox power theory and its application, and turns to new models involving decision-making, communications, non-alignment and a system of state relations not dependent upon power.

WORLD POLITICS IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. BY HAYWARD R. ALKER, JR. AND BRUCE M. RUSSETT. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965, 326 p. $7.50.

A serious effort to use some quite sophisticated quantitative techniques in describing and analyzing the political process in the General Assembly.

REGIONALISM AND WORLD ORDER. BY RONALD J. YALEM. Washington: Public Affairs Press, 1965, 160 p. $4.50.

A study both of the theoretical premises of regionalism and of regional organizations and their operation under the League of Nations and the United Nations.

NOTE-By special arrangement with World Affairs Book Center, readers of FOREIGN AFFAIRS may obtain, post free, any book published in the United States (except paperbacks) at the publisher's regular list price. Send orders, with check or money order, to Desk FA, World Affairs Book Center, 345 East 46 Street, New York 17, New York.

THE INDUCTIVE APPROACH TO INTERNATIONAL LAW. BY GEORG SCHWARZENBERGER. Dobbs Ferry: Oceana Publications (for the London Institute of World Affairs), 1965, 209 p. $7.50.

A leading student of international law defines the inductive approach to the subject and defends it against a number of objections that have been raised against this method.

THE POLITICS OF SOCIALISM. BY R. H. S. CROSSMAN. New York: Atheneum, 1965, 252 p. $5.95.

Essays and articles of the 1950s and 1960s by a lively maverick member of the British Labor Party. The two prominent themes are the rethinking of socialism-a much needed enterprise-and thoughts on the cold war.

STRANGE COMMUNISTS I HAVE KNOWN. BY BERTRAM D. WOLFE. New York: Stein and Day, 1965, 222 p. $6.00.

A portrait gallery of unconventional Communists, including John Reed, Angelica Balabanoff, Rosa Luxemburg, Maxim Litvinov and Trotsky.

THE SPY WITHOUT A COUNTRY. BY H. K. RONBLÖM. New York: Coward-McCann, 1965, 222 p. $4.50.

The story of the Swedish Air Attaché, Colonel Stig Wennerströrn, a quite successful double agent until his arrest in 1963.

THE WORLD CHANGERS. BY BRUCE BLIVEN. New York: Day, 1965, 418 p. $6.50.

A former editor of The New Republic reviews the 1930s and 1940s in the form of biographical sketches of Roosevelt, Churchill, Hitler, Stalin, Mussolini, Gandhi, Chiang Kai-shek and Hirohito.

AND THE CROOKED SHALL BE MADE STRAIGHT: THE EICHMANN TRIAL, THE JEWISH CATASTROPHE, AND HANNAH ARENDT'S NARRATIVE. BY JACOB ROBINSON. New York: Macmillan, 1965, 406 p. $6.95.

A sharp, detailed, at times pedantic, critique of Hannah Arendt's book on the Eichmann trial ("Eichmann in Jerusalem"), which not infrequently misses the point of her report.

DER ZWEITE WELTKRIEG UND DIE KRIEGSSCHULDFRAGE (DIE HOGGAN-KONTROVERSE). BY KURT GLASER. Würzburg: Marienburg-Verlag, 1965, 167 p. DM. 14.80.

A discussion, itself bound to raise controversy, of the dispute over the "war guilt" question, centering on David L. Hoggan's book.

COMMUNITY OF FATE: GERMAN-SOVIET DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS, 1922-1928. BY KURT ROSENBAUM. Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1965, 325 p. $6.75.

While affording some useful documentary evidence from the German archives, this is not a major contribution to what is by now a rather familiar subject.

LETTERS FROM THE PARIS PEACE CONFERENCE. BY CHARLES SEYMOUR. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965, 289 p. $7.50.

Valuable for the historian of the Peace Conference of 1919, this volume comprises letters which the late Charles Seymour, a member of the Inquiry, wrote to his family during his stay in Paris. The book has been edited by Harold B. Whiteman, Jr.

THE UNIVERSITY LOOKS ABROAD. New York: Walker, 1966, 300 p. $6.00.

The result of a study conducted by Education and World Affairs on the international activities and interests of six American universities- Cornell, Indiana, Michigan State, Stanford, Tulane and Wisconsin.

HISTORICAL SURVEYS AND PORTRAITS. BY G. P. GOOCH. London: Longmans, 1966, 258 p. 50/.

A selection of Professor Gooch's articles and addresses over the last 40 years dealing both with general historical themes and with sketches of writers and statesmen.

CONVERSATIONS WITH WALTER LIPPMANN. Boston: Atlantic (Little, Brown), 1965, 242 p. $4.95.

A collection of the columnist's periodic C.B.S. television interviews since August 1960.

THE COMMUNIST INTERNATIONAL, 1919-1943: DOCUMENTS. VOLUME III, 1929-1943. SELECTED AND EDITED BY JANE DEGRAS. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 494 p. $14.40.

This valuable selection of documents on the Comintern covers the years from the disastrous turn to the left through the period of the popular front to the formal dissolution of the organization in 1943.

SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 1961. BY D. C. WATT. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 652 p. $17.60.

DOCUMENTS ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 1961. SELECTED AND EDITED BY D. C. WATT. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 834 p. $17.60.

The 1961 volume in the well-known series of "Surveys" resumes the practice of dealing with the events of a single year, though certain subjects, such as the effects of the break-up of the United Arab Republic, are being reserved for the subsequent volume. The arrangement of the volume of documents corresponds to the chapters in the "Survey."

POLITICAL HANDBOOK AND ATLAS OF THE WORLD, 1966. BY WALTER H. MALLORY. New York: Harper and Row (for the Council on Foreign Relations), 1966, 360 p. $8.50.

Brought up to date as of January 1, 1966, this standard annual reference work gives the composition of governments; sums up party programs and lists their leaders; lists newspapers, indicating their political affiliations and editors; and includes facts on the United Nations and associated international agencies. Includes a 32-page supplement of political maps.

General: Military, Technical and Scientific

TEST BAN AND DISARMAMENT: THE PATH OF NEGOTIATION. BY ARTHUR H. DEAN. New York: Harper and Row (for the Council on Foreign Relations), 1966, 153 p. $3.50 (Paper, $1.95).

Ambassador Dean, who had a prominent role in negotiating at Geneva and elsewhere, gives his views on the negotiating process and on the major political and other problems related to the nuclear test ban, limited arms control and general disarmament. A volume in the Policy Books Series of the Council on Foreign Relations.

THE DECISION TO DROP THE BOMB. BY LEN GIOVANNITTI AND FRED FREED. New York: Coward-McCann, 1965, 348 p. $6.00.

Another, and quite useful, contribution to the growing body of studies dealing with the complex of considerations that led to the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan. The book developed out of research for some N.B.C. television documentaries on the subject,

MARITIME STRATEGY: A STUDY OF DEFENSE PROBLEMS. BY VICE-ADMIRAL SIR PETER GRETTON. New York: Praeger, 1965, 210 p. $6.75.

A British naval officer seeks "to discover whether the expression 'Maritime Strategy' has any modern relevance," and if so, whether its principles still apply as far as the defense problems of Britain are concerned.

SECRECY AND THE ARMS RACE. BY MARTIN C. MCGUIRE. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1965, 249 p. $5.95.

An effort to present a theory of the arms race, with particular reference to the role played in it by information and secrecy. A quite technical study using a number of tools of economic analysis.

THE NATURE OF HUMAN CONFLICT. EDITED BY ELTON B. MCNEIL. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall, 1965, 315 p. $9.25.

An inter-disciplinary effort to get at the roots of human conflict, especially in war and international relations.

THE CRISIS GAME: SIMULATING INTERNATIONAL CONFLICT. BY SIDNEY F. GIFFIN. Garden City: Doubleday, 1965, 191 p. $4.95.

A helpful introduction to an evaluation of the techniques and utility of political and military gaming, by a former Air Force General, now a research associate of the Institute for Defense Analyses in Washington.

LE DRAME DE 1940. BY GENERAL BEAUFRE. Paris: Plon, 1965, 273 p. Fr. 13.50.

A leading French writer on military strategy here offers his recollections and reflections on the catastrophe of 1940 and its background.

PEDDLER OF DEATH: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF SIR BASIL ZAHAROFF. BY DONALD MCCORMICK. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1965, 255 p. $5.95.

An effort to trace the still murky career of the arms merchant who sold weapons from the Boer War to World War I.

FROM THE DREADNOUGHT TO SCAPA FLOW: THE ROYAL NAVY IN THE FISHER ERA, 1904- 1919. VOLUME II. BY ARTHUR J. MARDER. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 466 p. $14.00.

This second volume of Professor Marder's major history of the British Navy in the First World War carries the story from the outbreak of war to the eve of the battle of Jutland in May 1916.

General: Economic and Social

MODERN CAPITALISM: THE CHANGING BALANCE OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE POWER. BY ANDREW SHONFIELD. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 456 p. $10.50 (Paper, $4.50).

"What was it that converted capitalism from the cataclysmic failure which it appeared to be in the 1930s into the great engine of prosperity of the postwar Western world ?" In pursuit of that question, the Director of Studies at the Royal Institute of International Affairs has written a remarkable book examining in depth the postwar economic policies and practices of Britain, France, Germany and the United States (and several other countries more briefly). Out of contrasts and similarities he draws explanations of the characteristics of the postwar period and sets forth suggestive ideas about the relation of government and business in a modern democracy.

THE WORLD ECONOMY AT THE CROSSROADS. BY HARRY G. JOHNSON. New York: Oxford University Press, 1966, 106 p. $3.50.

An excellent short survey by a leading Canadian economist of the basic current problems of international economic policy facing the advanced countries: monetary organization, trade barriers and discrimination, and trade and financial relations with the less developed countries.

DEVELOPMENT FINANCE: PLANNING AND CONTROL. BY URSULA K. HICKS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 187 p. $3.50.

In writing this straightforward and systematic discussion of government getting, spending and control, Lady Hicks draws on a good bit of experience in advising governments of developing countries.

CAPITAL AND GROWTH. BY JOHN HICKS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 339 p. $5.00.

The other half of the Hicks team has written a theoretical book about a subject that, he says, "has no particular bearing on underdevelopment economics. . . ."

FUNDAMENTALE FRAGEN KÜNFTIGER WÄHRUNGSPOLITIK. EDITED BY FRANÇOIS BOCHUD. Basel: Kyklos-Verlag; Tübingen: Mohr, 1965, 230 p. DM. 23.

The gold price, flexible exchange rates and related matters as discussed by a group of experts in March 1965.

THE LAST REVOLUTION. BY L.-J. LEBRET. New York: Sheed, 1965, 213 p. $4.50.

A French Dominican who has influenced development planning in a number of countries denounces the Western world for unconcern, materialism and betrayal of its own values. Originally published in France in 1960.

GOVERNMENT RISK-SHARING IN FOREIGN INVESTMENT. BY MARINA VON NEUMANN WHITMAN. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965, 358 p. $8.50.

The most comprehensive account we have of the devices-other than tax incentives-by which the U.S. Government and several international agencies have sought to encourage private investment abroad. Professor Whitman's careful analysis shows how hard it is to get a clear assessment of the effects of these measures.

DIE NEUE OEKONOMISCHE POLITIK IN RUSSLAND UND DIE DEUTSCHE WÄHRUNGS- UND WIRTSCHAFTSREFORM: WÜRDIGUNG UND VERGLEICH. BY MIKLÓS GAAL, Winterthur: Schellenberg, 1965, 221 p. Swiss Fr. 24.

A comparative study of the N.E.P. in Russia and the German post-1945 currency and economic reforms.

GOVERNMENTAL POLICY AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION. EPITEP BY STEWAET FKASER. New York: Wiley, 1965, 373 p. $7.50.

A symposium on various themes relating to the title, including sections on international education under Communism and our development of area studies.

PROBLEMS OF AID TO EDUCATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES. BY LADISLAV CERYCH. New York: Praeger (for the Atlantic Institute), 1965, 213 p. $7.50.

An effort to analyze the body of recent experience with respect to educational aid to developing countries-its role at various levels, forms and means, and problems of creating appropriate organizational and institutional frameworks.

The United States

A THOUSAND DAYS: JOHN F. KENNEDY IN THE WHITE HOUSE. BY ARTHUR M. SCHLESINGER, JR. Boston: Houghton, 1965, 1,087 p. $9.00.

This account of the Kennedy Administration by the late Presidents Special Assistant is both absorbing reading and a very important source for American domestic and foreign policies in those years. It is, as the author says, a personal memoir and at times the personal element outruns the balance of the historian or the prudence of the recorder of contemporary issues. The occasion of much debate and argument, the book will remain, however, a prime document for the Kennedy years.

LBJ'S INNER CIRCLE. BY CHARLES ROBERTS. New York: Delacorte Press, 1965, 223 p. $5.00.

A somewhat journalistic account of the White House staff by the Acting Bureau Chief of Newsweek's Washington bureau.

THE UNCERTAIN GIANT: 1921-1941. BY SELIG ABLER. New York: Macmillan, 1966, 340 p. $6.95.

This work "intended primarily for the nonspecialist" provides a concise review of U. S. foreign policy between the two world wars.

THE OPINIONMAKERS. BY WILLIAM L. RIVERS. Boston: Beacon Press, 1965, 207 p. $4.95.

A report on the Washington press corps, including such influential figures as James Reston, Walter Lippmann and David Brinkley. The author, formerly a correspondent, is currently a professor of communications at Stanford.

AMERICA: PURPOSE AND POWER. EDITED BY GENE M. LYONS. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1965, 384 p. $7.95 (Paper, $2.95).

A selection of essays, sponsored by the Public Affairs Center at Dartmouth College, dealing with the general theme of changing forces in American society, including the impact of international affairs.

THE FULBRIGHT PROGRAM: A HISTORY. BY WALTER JOHNSON AND FRANCIS J. COLLIGAN. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1965, 380 p. $8.50.

A history of the program, properly associated with the name of Senator Fulbright, that initiated, under Public Law 584 of the Seventy-Sixth Congress (1946), vastly expanded American activities in the fields of international educational and scholarly exchange.

SCHOOLS FOR STRATEGY: EDUCATION AND RESEARCH IN NATIONAL SECURITY AFFAIRS. BY GENE M. LYONS AND LOUIS MORTON. New York: Praeger, 1965, 356 p. $7.50.

A valuable review of the intellectual role of American universities and research groups in contributing to national security activities in recent years.

UNDERCURRENTS IN AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS. BY M. S. VENKATARAMANI. New York: Asia Publishing: House, 1965, 218 p. (New York: Taplinger, distributor, $6.00).

Four episodes as viewed by an Indian scholar: The Roosevelt Administration and the Indian famine, the U.S. and India's food crisis in 1946, the Suez crisis, and the U-2 incident.

THIS U.S.A. BY BEN J. WATTENBERG IN COLLABORATION WITH RICHARD M. SCAMMON. Garden City: Doubleday, 1965, 520 p. $7.50.

A lively account of some of the findings about American life to be drawn from the 1960 census. Mr. Wattenberg, a journalist, was assisted in this endeavor by the Director of the Bureau of the Census, 1961-65.

HOME PLACE: THE STORY OF THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. BY WILLIAM S. WHITE. Boston: Houghton, 1965, 175 p. $4.00.

The author of "Citadel," a study of the U.S. Senate, has turned to the House of Representatives, its tone, the types who sit in it, its strengths and weaknesses.

MORNING AND NOON. BY DEAN ACHESON. Boston: Houghton, 1965, 288 p. $6.00.

These ably written memoirs of the youth and early career of the former Secretary of State are pleasantly revealing of the man, but stop at 1941 when Mr. Acheson became Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs.

THE HIGH MINISTRY OF GOVERNMENT: THE POLITICAL CAREER OF FRANK MURPHY. BY RICHARD D. LUNT. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1965, 263 p. $8.50.

A study of the political career of a man who served as mayor of Detroit, Governor-General of the Philippines, Governor of Michigan, U, S. Attorney General and eventually justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

The Western Hemisphere

IN DEFENCE OF CANADA: APPEASEMENT AND REARMAMENT. BY JAMES EAYRS. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1965, 261 p. $6.95.

In this second volume dealing with Canadian defense issues and foreign policy the author covers the period from the Italian attack on Ethiopia to the autumn of 1940.

OBSTACLES TO CHANGE IN LATIN AMERICA. EDITED BY CLAUDIO VELIZ. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 263 p. $6.75.

Drawn from a conference at Chatham House in February 1965, these essays, by prominent Latin American academicians from different disciplines, emphasize the need for fundamental institutional change in Latin America and the necessity for Latin America to find indigenous solutions for her problems.

LATIN AMERICA: POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND HEMISPHERIC SECURITY. EDITED BY NORMAN A. BAILEY. New York: Praeger (for the Center for Strategic Studies), 1965, 289 p. $9.00.

Compiled from a conference at Georgetown University in July 1964, these papers treat varied aspects of contemporary Latin American issues. Of particular interest are those by Donald Dozer, Eudocio Ravines and Paulo Ayres Filho, dealing respectively with the issues of the Canal, the ideological and intellectual conflict in Latin America, and the fall of the Goulart régime in Brazil.

L'AMÉRIQUE LATINE ENTRE HIER ET DEMAIN. BY CHRISTIAN RUDEL. Paris: Éditions du Centurion, 1965, 191 p. Fr. 10.50.

Scattered journalistic reflections on the revolutionary nature of contemporary Latin America, with an optimistic assessment of the role being played by the developing Christian Democratic movement,

ALLIANCE WITHOUT ALLIES: THE MYTHOLOGY OF PROGRESS IN LATIN AMERICA. BY VÍCTOR ALBA. New York: Praeger, 1965, 244 p. $6.95.

A translation of "Parásitos, Mitos y Sordomudos" (1964), this book is a passionate and purposely polemical condemnation of the Alliance for Progress. While the author accepts the objectives of the Alliance, he believes these goals have been denied by the actions of the oligarchic élite in Latin America and by U.S. policies which fail to identify or reach the masses.

AN ATLAS OF LATIN AMERICAN AFFAIRS. BY RONALD M. SCHNEIDER AND ROBERT C. KINGSBURY. New York: Praeger, 1965, 136 p. $4.00 (Paper, $1.75).

Part of the Praeger series of world-affairs atlases, this lucid and pertinent text accompanies 60 maps and covers general Latin American problems along with essential national data.

LATIN AMERICAN TRADE PATTERNS. BY DONALD W. BAERRESEN AND OTHERS. Washington: Brookings Institution, 1965, 329 p. $6.00.

This study, primarily a compilation of statistical materials pertaining to Latin American trade, examines the problems of economic integration of the region.

DOMINICAN DIARY. BY TAD SZULC. New York: Delacorte Press, 1965, 306 p. $6.00.

In this provocative, fascinating and perceptive first-hand account of the Dominican tragedy, the correspondent for The New York Times analyzes the impact of U.S. policy during the early weeks of the civil war. The author contends that the U.S. inability to comprehend the nature of the struggle, caused in large measure by fear of another Cuba, resulted in actions which have only strengthened extremist groups of both left and right while negating the influence of those who speak for a democratically social revolution.

THE UNFINISHED EXPERIMENT: DEMOCRACY IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC. BY JUAN BOSCH. New York: Praeger, 1965, 239 p. $5.95

In this terse and cogent story of the post-Trujillo period, from May 1961 to May 1964, President Juan Bosch examines those attitudes resulting from the Trujillista legacy which have prevented the emerging of a meaningful democratic revolution in the Dominican Republic.

INTER-AMERICAN CONFERENCES 1826-1954: HISTORY AND PROBLEMS. BY SAMUEL GUY INMAN. Washington: University Press of Washington, D.C., 1965, 282 p. $7.00.

Published posthumously, this optimistic history of the Inter-American System is highlighted by the personal experiences of a man long identified with and sympathetic to Latin America, its people and its problems.

U. S. POLICY IN LATIN AMERICA: A SHORT HISTORY. BY EDWIN LIEUWEN. New York: Praeger, 1965, 149 p. $4.95 (Paper, $1.75).

This brief and factual historical account of U.S. hemispheric policies stresses the "ever-increasing United States concern over Latin America."

A CENTURY OF DISAGREEMENT: THE CHAMIZAL CONFLICT 1864-1964. BY SHELDON B. LISS. Washington: University Press of Washington, D.C. (for the Latin American Institute), 1965, 167 p. $6.00.

A concise and studious appraisal of the thorny Chamizal dispute between the United States and Mexico, its origins and final settlement during the Kennedy Administration, supplemented by statistical materials and two inadequate maps.

THE CARIBBEAN: ITS HEALTH PROBLEMS. EDITED BY A. CURTIS WILGUS. Gainesville: University of Florida Press, 1965, 273 p. $7.50.

This uneven and varied collection of papers is based on the Fifteenth Annual Caribbean Conference held at the University of Florida.

PARTY POLITICS IN PUERTO RICO. BY ROBERT W. ANDERSON. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1965, 269 p. $6.75.

A somewhat pedantically written but worthwhile examination of political parties in Puerto Rico-from 1940 through 1964. The author, in examining Puerto Rico's political structure through its own party system, stresses that "Puerto Rican political life is conditioned by the island's preoccupation with its constitutional, political, and cultural 'status.' "

A STUDY ON CUBA. Coral Gables: University of Miami Press, 1965, 774 p. $12.50.

In this abridged English translation of the 1963 edition, the Cuban Economic Research Project, centered at the University of Miami and tinder the direction of Dr. Jose R. Alvarez Diaz, traces statistically the development of the Cuban economy, past and present.

LAS EMPRESAS ESTATALES EN EL PERÚ. Lima: Centre de Documentación Económico- Social, 1965, 219 p. Soles 20,

Published by an agency dedicated to the defense of free enterprise, this book examines various state enterprises (i.e. steel, oil, electric power, batiks, housing, tourism, etc.) and not surprisingly concludes that these "state enterprises dedicated to industrial or commercial operations have retarded rather than aided the development of Peru."

Western Europe

THE RULE OF LAW IN EUROPEAN INTEGRATION: THE PATH OF THE SCHUMAN PLAN. BY STUART A. SCHEINGOLD. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1965, 331 p. $7.50.

The activities of the Court of Justice of the European Communities, like those of the U. S. Supreme Court, are of more than legal interest. By studying the political and economic aspects of the Court's work under the coal and steel treaty, Dr. Scheingold has turned a Ph.D. dissertation into a significant addition to the literature on the Schuman Plan.

THE STRUCTURE, FUNCTION, AND LAW OF A FREE TRADE AREA: THE EUROPEAN FREE TRADE ASSOCIATION. BY JOHN S. LAMBRINIDIS. New York: Praeger (for the London Institute of World Affairs), 1965, 303 p. $12.50.

A Greek barrister with British experience provides a detailed exegesis of the EFTA treaty and the practices under it.

THE EUROPEAN RIGHT: A HISTORICAL PROFILE. EDITED BY HANS ROGGER AND EUGEN WEBER. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1965, 589 p. $9.50.

An analysis by American and European scholars of the diverse manifestations of right-wing movements in n East and West European countries, chiefly in this century. An indispensable, if uneven, introduction, with thoughtful efforts at synthesis by the editors.

LA FUSION DES COMMUNAUTÉS EUROPÉENNES. Liège: Université de Liège, Faculté de Droit; The Hague: Nijhoff, 1965, 295 p.

A symposium on the legal aspects of the fusion of the European communities.

THE POLITICS OF BRITISH DEFENSE POLICY, 1945-1962. BY WILLIAM P. SNYDER. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1965, 284 p. $6.25.

A clear and useful survey of the evolution of British defense planning in a period of shrinking power, by a West Point graduate and instructor.

BRITISH STRATEGY AND POLITICS, 1914 TO 1918. BY PAUL GUINN. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 359 p. $7.20.

A fine study of the political background of Britain's strategic planning in the Great War, written with verve and objectivity, and based on new sources. This scholar's work has more dramatic impact-and provides greater impetus to reflection-than most popular accounts. The terrifying limitations on intelligence and imagination in the wartime leadership have rarely been drawn better.

THE BRITISH ECONOMY IN 1975. BY W. BECKERMAN AND ASSOCIATES. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1965, 631 p. $15.50.

While the British Government was working out a five-year plan, a group at the National Institute for Economic and Social Research was trying to see what the British economy would look like in the mid 70s, provided it grows faster than it did in the '50s and early '60s. Requirements and interrelations are important to the analysis but basically, says the director of the Institute, this is a book "about the opportunities open to us. . . ."

COMMONWEALTH BANKING SYSTEMS. EDITED BY W. F. CRICK. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 536 p. $8.00.

"Outside the United Kingdom" might well be added to the title, though London comes back in as the center of the system. This basic survey, written mostly by people from the areas covered, largely replaces the volume edited by Professor Sayers in 1952.

VIA PORTS: FROM HONG KONG TO HONG KONG. BY ALEXANDER GRANTHAM. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press; New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 205 p. $6.00.

British Colonial Service memoirs in outposts of the far-flung empire, from 1922 to the author's retirement as Governor of Hong Kong in 1957.

A NEW ROAD FOR FRANCE. BY JACQUES SOUSTELLE. New York: Speller, 1965, 278 p. $5.95.

A bitter indictment of the Gaullist road, by a former close associate of the General in the Resistance, Soustelle broke with de Gaulle over Algeria and still thinks the Algerian settlement "the greatest crime in the history of France." Embittered in exile, he is nevertheless an intelligent spokesman of the irreconcilable opposition to de Gaulle and decolonization.

LES ORGANISATIONS PROFESSIONNELLES FRANÇAISES ET LE MARCHÉ COMMUN. BY JÁNOS SZOKOLÓCZY-SYLLABA. Paris: Colin, 1965, 372 p. Fr. 27.

French industrialists were generally opposed to the Common Market or at least worried about it, hut they adapted to the change rather well and developed more favorable views. The author documents this process with valuable studies of the cotton, woolen, automobile and electrical industries, describing their economic problems and pressure-group activities.

UNITED STATES DIRECT INVESTMENT IN FRANCE: AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FRENCH CHARGES. BY ALLAN W. JOHNSTONE. Cambridge : M.I.T. Press, 1965, 109 p. $4.00.

This book examines the complaint in some French quarters that U. S. investment is a threat to French economic sovereignty. Facts, figures, a recital of recent events and the results of a questionnaire to American firms with French subsidiaries make this a useful little book.

PARIS JOURNAL: 1944-1965. BY JANET PLANNER (GENÊT). New York: Atheneum, 1965, 615 p. $8.95.

A selective and intelligent portrait of postwar France, drawn by The New Yorker's Genêt, who began her Paris reporting in 1925. Her letters range from the wretched gloriousness of the Liberation to the prosperous uncertainties of today.

LA DÉCISION POLITIQUE EN BELGIQUE: LE POUVOIR ET LES GROUPES. UNDER THE DIRECTION OF JEAN MEYNAUD AND OTHERS. Paris: Colin, 1965, 403 p. Fr. 22.

A summary of the bases of Belgian politics and an analysis of the politics of major decisions since 1945. A valuable work, by many scholars.

LES PAYS NORDIQUES (DANEMARK, FINLANDE, NORVÈGE, SUÈDE, ISLANDE). BY RAYMOND FUSILIER. Paris: Librairie Générate de Droit, 1965, 295 p. Fr. 36.30.

A French scholar offers a brief, useful survey of the political institutions of the five Nordic countries today.

POLITICAL PARTIES IN NORWAY: A COMMUNITY STUDY. BY HENRY VALEN AND DANIEL KATZ. Oslo: Universitetsforlaget; London: Tavistock Publications, 1964, 383 p. 55/.

A Norwegian and an American political scientist join in a broadly gauged study of the structure and functioning of Norwegian parties, based largely on interim research of the Stavanger region in the general election of 1957.

LA SUISSE OU L'HISTOIRE D'UN PEUPLE HEUREUX. BY DENIS DE ROUGEMONT. Paris: Hachette, 1965, 305 p. Fr. 14.59.

A splendid survey of Swiss culture and a fervent argument that that happily diverse country should become a model for a federated Europe. A serious and delightful book.

THE GRAND DESIGN: A EUROPEAN SOLUTION TO GERMAN REUNIFICATION. BY FRANZ JOSEF STRAUSS. New York: Praeger, 1966, 105 p. $3.95. (London: Weidenfeld, 1965, 18/).

The former West German Defense Minister outlines his activist program: The building of a European Federation, armed by Anglo-French nuclear weapons, allied to the United States, and strong enough to bring about German reunification. An important pronouncement, and a clear plea for his nation's political rehabilitation-and his own.

DER NOTENWECHSEL ZWISCHEN DEM HEILIGEN STUHL UND DER DEUTSCHEN REICHSREGIERUNG. I: VON DER RATIFIZIERUNG DES REICHSKONKORDATS BIS ZUR ENZYKLIKA "MIT BRENNENDER SORGE." EDITED BY DIETER ALBRECHT. Mainz: Matthias-Grünewald-Verlag, 1965, 459 p. DM. 45.

A collection of the diplomatic notes between the Vatican and the German government from July 1933 to March 1937. Most of the Vatican notes were written by Cardinal Pacelli and add an important dimension to the current controversy about his role. Some Vatican messages to the German episcopate are included in this scholarly edition sponsored by the new Catholic Academy of Bavaria.

THE GERMAN ECONOMY AT WAR. BY ALAN S. MILWARD. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 214 p. $6.00. (University of London, Athlone Press, 35/).

Drawn largely from documents of the Speer Ministry, this study supports previous analyses of the less-than-total mobilization of the German war economy and shows how resistance to adequate concentration of power in any part of the government helped produce that result.

GOEBBELS AND NATIONAL SOCIALIST PROPAGANDA, 1925-1945. BY ERNEST K. BRAMSTED. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press, 1965, 488 p. $12.50.

The most complete study of the subject as well as a scholarly and suggestive contribution to the general study of the functions of twentieth- century propaganda.

SPAIN: THE GENTLE ANARCHY. BY BENJAMIN WELLES. New York: Praeger, 1965, 386 p. $7.95.

A pleasant, exceedingly gentle introduction to contemporary Spain, by a New York Times correspondent who liked his six-year stint there.

Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union

COMECON: INTEGRATION PROBLEMS OF THE PLANNED ECONOMIES. BY MICHAEL KASER. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 215 p. $5.60.

Combining some personal observation with an impressive review of the rather fragmentary published evidence, this book immediately takes its place as the leading Western work on the Council for Economic Mutual Assistance of the Communist countries. The author is an Oxford don who spent a number of years on the staff of the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe dealing with East-West relations.

RUSSIA AND HISTORY'S TURNING POINT. BY ALEXANDER KERENSKY. New York: Duell, 1965, 558 p. $8.95.

The readable and historically informative memoirs of the leading figure in Russia's Provisional Government following the fall of the Tsar. The narrative naturally centers on the critical year 1917, which was indeed a major historical turning point.

THE GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS OF THE SOVIET UNION. BY LEONARD SCHAPIRO. New York: Random House, 1965, 191 p. $3.95.

A useful and concise introduction by a leading scholar in the field.

A STUDY IN SURVIVAL: THE CHURCH IN RUSSIA 1927-1943. BY WILLIAM C. FLETCHER. New York: Macmillan, 1965, 168 p. $4.95.

A monograph on the Russian Orthodox Church's struggle for survival in the Stalin era, with particular attention to the work of Metropolitan Sergii.

SOCIAL SCIENCES IN THE USSR. Paris: Mouton, 1965, 297 p. Fr. 35.

A survey of the historical, philosophical, economic and juridical sciences, prepared by the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences at UNESCO's request and designed for the Western reader.

BEZ TIES?B?M UN BR?V?BAS: LATVIJAS SOVJETIZ?CIJA 1944-1965. BY ADOLFS ?ILDE. Copenhagen: Imanta, 1965, 436 p.

An account of the Sovietization of Latvia from 1944 to 1965, containing detailed information on the Communist Party of Latvia, economic and population problems, educational reforms and anti-Soviet resistance.

FINLAND AND THE GREAT POWERS. BY G. A. GRIPENBERG. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1965, 380 p. $5.75.

The diplomatic memoirs of Finland's envoy to London, the Vatican and Stockholm during the Second World War.

FINNLAND HEUTE: EIN LAND BEWÄLTIGT SEINE GEGENWART. BY REINHOLD DEY. Düsseldorf: Econ-Verlag, 1965, 296 p. DM. 19.80.

A general survey of postwar Finland by a German journalist with ten years' experience in the country.

PALUU KARJALAAN. BY SEPPO SIMONEN. Helsinki: Otava, 1965, 337 p. Fmk. 30.

A detailed study of the Karelian refugees' return to their homes for three years of valiant reconstruction work, followed by a second flight, 1941-44.

YUGOSLAVIA. BY PHYLLIS AUTY. New York: Walker, 1965, 251 p. $6.50.

A concise but informed and informative general history by a scholar at the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, University of London. Her emphasis is on the period since 1945.

ALBANIA'S CAPTIVES. BY PYRRHUS J. RUCHES. Chicago: Argonaut, 1965, 213 p. $5.00.

A hardly dispassionate plea for the return of "Northern Epirus" to Greece.

The Middle East

THE ARAB COLD WAR, 1958-1964: A STUDY OF IDEOLOGY IN POLITICS. BY MALCOLM KERR. New York: Oxford University Press (for the Royal Institute of International Affairs), 1965, 139 p. $1.70 (Paper).

A compact and authoritative interpretation of inter-Arab rivalries, the Egyptian-Syrian relationship in particular, by an American political scientist of long experience in the Arab world.

ALLENBY OF ARABIA: LAWRENCE'S GENERAL. BY BRIAN GARDNER. New York: Coward- McCann, 1966, 314 p. $6.50.

"What an idol the man was to us," wrote Lawrence of his commander General Allenby, the victor in Palestine in 1918. To Lawrence, Allenby remarked, "In fifty years your name will be a household word; to find out about Allenby they will have to go to the War Museum." Not so if this able biography of an outstanding officer has the circulation it deserves.

THE LEBANESE CRISIS, 1958: A DOCUMENTARY STUDY. EDITED BY M. S. AGWANI. New York: Asia Publishing House (for the Indian School of International Studies), 1965, 407 p. (New York: Taplinger, distributor, $10.75).

An Indian scholar's reconstruction of a Lebanese crisis which became, with the landing of U. S. troops, a major cold-war confrontation.

ISRAEL: GROUP RELATIONS IN A NEW SOCIETY. BY ALEX WEINGROD. New York: Praeger (for the Institute of Race Relations, London), 1965, 82 p. $4.00.

"With its proportionately huge influx of immigrants, Israel has become a multi-ethnic society. . . . Can a viable state emerge from a society so fragmented ?" Dr. Weingrod in this very brief and sensible book believes it can, although in all probability Israel would continue to be a multi-ethnic society.

STRUKTURWANDLUNGEN DER ISRAELISCHEN VOLKSWIRTSCHAFT, GLOBAL UND REGIONAL, 1948-1975. BY RENÉ L. FREY. Basel: Kyklos-Verlag; Tübingen: Mohr, 1965, 142 p. DM. 20.

Forecasting national and regional trends in Israel as a basis for maintaining a satisfactory rate of economic development.

BEN GURION LOOKS BACK: IN TALKS WITH MOSHE PEARLMAN. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1965, 260 p. $5.00.

Reminiscences, philosophy and opinions, always interesting, recorded with Boswellian devotion by a leading Israeli writer and public servant.

AREA DEVELOPMENT FOR NATIONAL GROWTH: THE TURKISH PRECEDENT. BY MALCOLM D. RIVKIN. New York: Praeger, 1965, 228 p. $15.00.

The lessons drawn from Turkish efforts over 40 years to stimulate the development of its interior regions are of clear import to other similarly motivated nations.

DER WIRTSCHAFTSAUFBAU DES IRAN. BY SOHRAB FARAHMAND. Basel: Kyklos-Verlag; Tübingen: Mohr, 1965, 179 p. DM. 19.

This compressed study is a well-grounded contribution to the literature of economic development.

South and Southeast Asia

ASIAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. EDITED BY CRANLEY ONSLOW. New York: Praeger, 1965, 242 p. $7.00.

Case studies of postwar economic development in Burma, Ceylon, India, Malaya, Pakistan and Thailand by leading economists in each of those countries. The final chapter, a comparative analysis by the editor, urges greater initiative from the more developed countries and a change in their aid programs, which currently retard rather than promote material progress in Asia.

CONTEMPORARY INDIA. EDITED BY BAIDYA NATH VARMA. New York: Asia Publishing House, 1965, 362 p. (New York: Taplinger, distributor, $13.00).

A collection of chapters on social institutions in India and its political, economic and socio-cultural processes, together with an assessment of their sources of strength and weakness.

INDIA AND THE COMMONWEALTH, 1885-1929. BY S. R. MEHROTRA. New York: Praeger, 1965, 287 p. $8.50.

An Indian's study of India's role in the shaping of the Commonwealth idea from the establishment of the National Congress Party in 1885 to 1929, when the goal of "complete independence" was set. Dr. Mehrotra, now of the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies, includes valuable analyses of the attitudes of the Muslim League and the contribution of the Liberals and of the Liberal Federation.

LAL BAHADUR: A POLITICAL BIOGRAPHY. BY D. R. MANKEKAR. Bombay: Popular Prakashan, 1964, 168 p. Rs. 10. (New York: Heinman, distributor, 1965, $4.50).

The life and career of the late prime minister, Mr. Shastri, and the major influences that shaped Indian politics during his premiership. Based primarily on interviews with him and the detailed answers to a lengthy questionnaire submitted by the author.

FACTIONAL POLITICS IN AN INDIAN STATE: THE CONGRESS PARTY IN UTTAR PRADESH. BY PAUL R. BRASS. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1965, 262 p. $6.00.

An analysis of problems of party organization at the local and district levels, and the means the Indian National Congress has used to cope with them.

A GEOGRAPHY OF PAKISTAN. BY KAZI S. AHMAD. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 216 p. $8.00.

The state of Pakistan, constituted as it is of two divided parts dissimilar in physical features, climate, people, language and means of livelihood, poses unusual difficulties to a geographer. Professor Ahmad, of the University of the Panjab in Lahore, nevertheless provides a handy reference geography that encompasses the entire area.

COMMUNALISM AND THE POLITICAL PROCESS IN MALAYA. BY K. J. RATNAM. Kuala Lumpur: University of Malaya Press (for the University of Singapore), 1965, 248 p. (New York: Oxford University Press, $7.70).

The political consequences of communal divisions in the Federation of Malaya, with emphasis on the postwar period up to 1961, which saw the non- Malay population demanding increased political rights and thus posing a threat to the privileged Malays. Dr. Ratnam is a political scientist at the University of Singapore.

VIETNAM AND THE UNITED STATES. BY HANS J. MORGENTHAU. Washington: Public Affairs Press, 1965, 112 p. $3.25.

A collection of occasional pieces by one of the most articulate opponents of United States policy.

THE PREVAILING WIND: WITNESS IN INDO-CHINA. BY MICHAEL FIELD. London: Methuen, 1965, 392 p. 42/.

Michael Field, a correspondent for the Daily Telegraph, spent the years 1956-1962 observing and analyzing political events in Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam.

THE COMMUNIST PARTY OF INDONESIA: ITS HISTORY, PROGRAM AND TACTICS. BY JUSTUS M. VAN DER KROEF. Vancouver: Publications Centre, University of British Columbia, 1965, 347 p. $7.50 (Paper, $5.50).

An outline history of the Indonesian Communist Party, its program and organization, its power at home and its role in the international scene- ending, of course, before last autumn's cataclysm.

The Far East and Pacific Ocean

THE AMERICAN PEOPLE AND CHINA. BY A. T. STEELE. New York: McGraw-Hill (for the Council on Foreign Relations), 1966, 325 p. $7.50.

An examination of American public attitudes toward China and U. S. China policy based upon more than 200 interviews with persons in leadership positions throughout the country and a number of opinion surveys. The author concludes that Americans today are generally ill-equipped to deal with the issues which the China problem poses for U. S. foreign policy, and he recommends that the President take the initiative in reopening a public dialogue on the subject.

POLICIES TOWARD CHINA: VIEWS FROM SIX CONTINENTS. EDITED BY A. M. HALPERN. New York: McGraw-Hill (for the Council on Foreign Relations), 1966, 528 p. $9.95.

Sixteen country and area specialists examine the China policies of non- Communist countries. Mr. Halpern contributes an introduction and a concluding chapter in which he points up the significant patterns and unique features which emerge from the individual analyses and assesses the implications for U. S. policy.

COMMUNIST CHINA'S ECONOMIC GROWTH AND FOREIGN TRADE. BY ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN. New York: McGraw-Hill (for the Council on Foreign Relations), 1966, 363 p. $8.50.

A long-time student of the Chinese economy looks at economic progress and economic problems on the Chinese mainland from the standpoint of their impact upon Communist China's foreign policy. He pays particular attention to the relationship between internal development and foreign trade. This and the two preceding books are the first of perhaps a dozen volumes resulting from the Council on Foreign Relations' three-year "China study."

PARTY AND ARMY: PROFESSIONALISM AND POLITICAL CONTROL IN THE CHINESE OFFICER CORPS, 1949-1964. BY ELLIS JOFFE. Cambridge: East Asian Research Center, Harvard University, 1965, 198 p. (Harvard University Press, distributor, $3.25, Paper).

A detailed analysis, based largely on translated Chinese publications, of the relationship between party leadership and the officer corps in Communist China, with emphasis on the clash between military professionalism and the need for political control. In the concluding chapter of his work, which grew out of a Harvard East Asian Research Center seminar, the author raises numerous questions without attempting to answer them because of the uncertain nature of the available data.

CHINA IN CRISIS. BY SVEN LINDQVIST. New York: Crowell, 1965, 125 p. $5.95.

Mr. Lindqvist records his keen observations on life and politics at Peking University in 1961-62, when he was the Swedish Embassy's Cultural Attache to the People's Republic of China. Interesting and informative.

PLANNING IN CHINESE AGRICULTURE: SOCIALISATION AND THE PRIVATE SECTOR, 1956- 1962. BY KENNETH R. WALKER. Chicago: Aldine Publishing Co., 1965, 109 p. $5.00.

In a short but well-documented survey, Mr. Walker points to the important and controversial role of agriculture in Communist China, especially its non-socialized, as opposed to its governmental and communal, aspects. He also compares it with Soviet collectivization. He concludes that home-owned garden plots have come to play a significant part in China's economic life.

REPORT FROM A CHINESE VILLAGE. BY JAN MYRDAL. New York: Pantheon Books, 1965, 373 p. $6.95.

Mr. Myrdal, Swedish anthropologist, and Mrs. Myrdal lived in the village of Liu Ling, in northern Shensi, for a month in late 1962. The book gives, in the form of biographies of a number of its inhabitants, accounts of changes in life and thought among the villagers.

A BRIEF DIPLOMATIC HISTORY OF MODERN JAPAN. BY MORINOSUKE KAJIMA. Rutland: Turtle, 1965, 216 p. $4.50.

Mr. Kajima, diplomat, businessman and member of Japan's House of Councillors since 1953, reviews the development of Japan's foreign policy from postwar recovery to the present, with stress on major diplomatic issues still pending-recognition of Red China, Japanese-Nationalist China relations, economic diplomacy, relations with Korea.

Africa

THE FOREIGN POLICY OF AFRICAN STATES. BY DOUDOU THIAM. New York: Praeger, 1965, 134 p. $4.50.

The Foreign Minister of the Republic of Senegal provides an incisive and lucid assessment of the ideological bases and the political and economic determinants of the foreign policies of African states. (The French edition appeared in 1963.)

A POLITICAL HISTORY OF TROPICAL AFRICA. BY ROBERT I. ROTBERG. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1965, 440 p. $12.50.

A first-rate and highly readable history of the peoples of tropical Africa from ancient times through the triumph of contemporary nationalism.

LA RÉPUBLIQUE ALGÉRIENNE DÉMOCRATIQUE ET POPULAIRE. BY FRANÇOIS BUY. Paris: Librairie Française, 1965, 257 p. Fr. 15.

An indignant French documentation of events in Algeria under Ben Bella 1962- 65, its accelerating economic and social degeneration toward Communist totalitarianism, and its increasing involvement economically and militarily with the U.S.S.R. and its allies.

MODERNIZATION AND AFRICAN LABOR: A TUNISIAN CASE STUDY. BY WILLARD A. BELING. New York: Praeger, 1965, 259 p. $12.50.

An examination of the influence of Tunisian nationalism and trans-national ideological currents (Pan-Arabism, Pan-Maghrebism and Pan-Africanism) on the international relations of the Tunisian labor movement.

LABOR AND POLITICS IN LIBYA AND ARAB AFRICA. BY JOHN NORMAN. New York: Bookman Associates, 1965, 219 p. $4.50.

A well-done study of the Libyan labor movement past and present, in a context of desert, poverty, nationalism and new-found oil.

SUDAN REPUBLIC. BY K. D. D. HENDERSON. New York: Praeger, 1965, 256 p. $8.50.

A readable account, "personal, but not, I hope, subjective," of the training period and preliminary trials of the new Sudan by a 36-year veteran of the Sudan political service, author of "Survey of the Anglo- Egyptian Sudan" (1946) and "The Making of the Modern Sudan" (1953).

THE SUDAN: CROSSROADS OF AFRICA. BY BESHIR MOHAMMED SAID. Chester Springs (Pa.) : Dufour, 1966, 238 p. $7.50.

"A Divided Nation" would be a subtitle more appropriate for this outspoken volume. A leading Sudanese journalist traces the history of, and apportions blame for, the problem of the South, and calls upon Northern statesmanship and Southern patience to produce a real Sudanese unity.

POLITICS IN WEST AFRICA. BY W. ARTHUR LEWIS. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 90 p. $3.50.

In these three lectures Professor Lewis offers a provocative and critical analysis of basic issues in African politics-the problem of national integration, the centralizing tendencies of single-party régimes, and the prospects for democratic institutions in Africa.

TROIS EXPÉRIENCES AFRICAINES DE DÉVELOPPEMENT: LE MALI, LA GUINÉE ET LE GHANA. BY SAMIR AMIN. Paris: Presses Universitaires, 1965, 233 p. Fr. 16.

An informative analysis of Malian efforts to restructure the inherited colonial economy and a critical evaluation of economic planning and development in Mali, Guinea and Ghana.

RECHERCHES SUR L'EXERCICE DU POUVOIR POLITIQUE EN AFRIQUE NOIRE (CÔTE- D'IVOIRE, GUINÉE, MALI). BY SEYDOU MADANI SY. Paris: Pedone, 1965, 230 p. Fr. 35.

Originally a doctoral thesis for the University of Dakar, this work provides a thoughtful comparative analysis of three single-party systems. The author, a Senegalese scholar, traces the inapplicability of Western models of constitutional democracy to the economic conditions and social structures which have decisively influenced the organization and exercise of political power in Guinea, Mali and the Ivory Coast.

NIGERIA: THE TRIBES, THE NATION, OR THE RACE-THE POLITICS OF INDEPENDENCE. BY FREDERICK A. O. SCHWARZ, JR. Cambridge: M.I.T. Press, 1965, 316 p. $10.00.

This interesting study of recent Nigerian political history is focused on the implications of regional and ethnic diversity for the creation of a new nation and the operation of democratic institutions.

THE SUDDEN ASSIGNMENT. BY LORD ALPORT. London: Hodder, 1965, 255 p. 35/.

Lord Alport, who served as British High Commissioner in Salisbury from January 1961, gives his personal account of the final dismemberment of the Central African Federation, 1961-63.

PAN-AFRICANISM AND EAST AFRICAN INTEGRATION. BY JOSEPH S. NYE, JR. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1965, 307 p. $7.50.

Mr. Nye's informative account of the social, economic and political bases of East African integration and his analysis of the reasons for the failure of attempts at federation in 1963 underscore the complex and significant role of ideological factors.

BRITAIN AND AFRICA. BY KENNETH KIRKWOOD. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Press, 1965, 235 p. $5.00.

A knowledgeable and rather optimistic survey of the historical evolution and contemporary character of British-African relations in different parts of the continent.

HISTORY OF EAST AFRICA. VOLUME II. EDITED BY VINCENT HARLOW AND E. M. CHILVER. New York: Oxford University Press, 1965, 766 p. $13.45.

This volume, the second in a three-part work on East African history, is an authoritative, scholarly study of the period from about 1890 through the Second World War.

ZANZIBAR: BACKGROUND TO REVOLUTION. BY MICHAEL F. LOFCHIE. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965, 316 p. $7.50.

A perceptive, well-informed examination of the historical, sociological and political origins of the January 1964 African revolution in Zanzibar.

SOUTH AFRICA. BY JOHN COPE. New York: Praeger, 1965, 236 p. $7.50.

Mr. Cope, a South African journalist and parliamentarian, traces the historical, economic and sociological roots of the racial crisis. He concludes that although it is unclear whether the political and economic freedom of non-whites will be achieved by violent revolution or peaceful political means, the sheer preponderance and economic indispensability of the African population assure the inevitable destruction of the apartheid order.

SOUTH AFRICAN TRAGEDY: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JAN HOFMEYR. BY ALAN PATON. New York: Scribner, 1965, 424 p. $10.00.

The dilemmas of contemporary South African history are masterfully interwoven into this penetrating portrait of the liberal South African leader, Jan Hofmeyr (1894-1948), and his inner struggle to free himself from the rising tide of white racism.

THE MALAGASY REPUBLIC: MADAGASCAR TODAY. BY VIRGINIA THOMPSON AND RICHARD ADLOFF. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1965, 504 p. $12.50.

A detailed, comprehensive study of Malagasy history, post-World War II political developments and the consolidation of the independent republic, together with sections dealing with religion, education, literature, economic policy and planning, transportation, finances, industry, trade and labor.

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