×

The Trouble With Congo

How Local Disputes Fuel Regional Conflict

Courtesy Reuters

When, in 2006, Joseph Kabila became the first democratically elected president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, many Congolese and international observers hoped that stability had finally come to the country. During the previous decade, Congo had been ravaged by widespread violence, including the world's deadliest conflict since World War II -- a conflict that involved three Congolese rebel movements, 14 foreign armed groups, and countless militias; killed over 3.3 million Congolese; and destabilized most of central Africa. In 2001, the United Nations dispatched to the country what was to become its largest and most expensive peacekeeping mission. A peace settlement was reached in 2003, paving the way for the 2006 elections. The entire effort was touted as an example of a successful international intervention in a collapsing state.

Yet over two million more Congolese have died since the official end of the war. According to the International Rescue Committee, over a thousand civilians continue

Loading, please wait...

Related Articles

This site uses cookies to improve your user experience. Click here to learn more.

Continue