×

Why Greece Will Cave—and How

Alexis Tsipras and the Debt Negotiations

Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras speaks to members of the media before the Eastern Partnership Summit session in Riga, Latvia, May 22, 2015. Ints Kalnins / Courtesy

Since the January 2015 election of a coalition government made up of the left-wing SYRIZA party and the right-wing ANEL (Independent Greeks) party, Greece has been in constant negotiation with the EU about reformulating the Greek bailout. Although Athens has often (but not always) denied it, any new deal will come with serious restrictions on the Greek people. 

The negotiations are secret, but there are plenty of leaks on both sides. They traffic not in facts but in the impressions of people participating in, or close to, the talks. It is clear that the Greek government is relentlessly optimistic—it has been expecting an agreement “any day now” ever since the removal of Yanis Varoufakis, the Greek finance minister, from the chief negotiating position last month—whereas the rest of the EU cannot see striking a deal anytime soon. 

A protester wearing a carnival mask depicting Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras takes part in an anti-austerity and pro-government demonstration in Athens, February 15, 2015.
A protester wearing a carnival mask depicting Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras takes part in an anti-austerity and pro-government demonstration in Athens, February 15, 2015. Yannis Behrakis / Reuters
In other words, the leaks and conflicting daily statements from participants offer

Loading, please wait...

Most Read Articles

Related Articles

This site uses cookies to improve your user experience. Click here to learn more.

Continue