Jahbahcon Francois, who suffers from cholera, rests in the arms of his mother at the Cholera Treatment Center run by the Haitian Ministry of Public Health and Population (MSPP) in collaboration with Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Port-au-Prince, April 17, 2015.
Andres Martinez Casares / Reuters

Pressure is mounting on the United States to push the United Nations to respond more effectively to the cholera epidemic that broke out in Haiti in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. The epidemic has reportedly killed at least 9,200 and, by some estimates, perhaps as many as three times that number. Hundreds of thousands more have been infected. And the devastation isn’t over; Haiti continues to struggle to contain a disease that it had not previously faced for over a century.

Evidence points to United Nations peacekeepers as the most likely source of the disease in Haiti. An expert panel commissioned by the United Nations itself pointed the finger at the “haphazard” disposal of human waste at a UN base close to the epicenter of the outbreak, near a tributary to Haiti’s largest river—the primary water source for tens of thousands of people. Most recently, news outlets reported

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