Skip to main content

The Islamic Republic of Iran has suffered a loss with the assassination of Qasem Soleimani, its most prominent military general. The nature and dimensions of that injury, however, are not a simple function of Soleimani’s high-profile regional role. The Quds Force, the external operations arm of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, will outlast its erstwhile commander, as will Iran’s regional security policy. But Soleimani’s assassination must still occasion soul searching within an establishment that failed to foresee the danger to his person and that has now lost a conspicuous star from its firmament.

Viewed from Tehran, the success of the U.S. air strike on Soleimani and his longtime colleague Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, deputy head of Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Forces, looks like a counterintelligence and security failure on the part of the Islamic Republic. An increasing number of unofficial accounts and news media reports suggest that

To read the full article

Most Read Articles

The Pandemic Depression

The Global Economy Will Never Be the Same

Carmen Reinhart and Vincent Reinhart

Beware the Guns of August—in Asia

How to Keep U.S.-Chinese Tensions From Sparking a War

Kevin Rudd

The Fragile Republic

American Democracy Has Never Faced So Many Threats All at Once

Suzanne Mettler and Robert C. Lieberman

Will the Coronavirus End Globalization as We Know It?

The Pandemic Is Exposing Market Vulnerabilities No One Knew Existed

Henry Farrell and Abraham Newman