Cathal McNaughton / Reuters A demonstrator waves the national flag as people gather to protest against austerity policies in central Dublin, January 31, 2015.

Lending Athens a Pot of Gold

Why Ireland Should Support Greek Debt Relief

After three long weeks of closure, Greece’s banks are beginning to open their doors to an expectant public. Following tense bailout negotiations, Greece received a seven billion euro ($7.6 billion) bridging loan to pay down 6.8 billion euros ($7.4 million) of the debt it owed last week to its official creditors. Essentially, it’s a new loan to pay off the old one. Or more accurately, it’s paying off the old loan plus interest. But the end of the deadlock has at least returned some normalcy to Greece. Checks can now be cashed. Limited transfers are again possible. Withdrawals are no longer limited to 60 euros ($66) per person per day, although capital controls remain in place, and will for some time. For now, the maximum withdrawal is 420 euros ($460) per day, and money cannot yet leave the country without approval from the finance ministry. This comes at the cost of more fiscal discipline for the Greeks, even though on the whole the country has already endured a level of austerity seen only during times of war or depression.

In all this, Ireland, a small and open economy that completed its own bailout program only two years ago, has stood shoulder to shoulder with the creditor nations of Europe in denying Greece any debt forgiveness. That is shameful.

Ireland is now recording some of the fastest growth rates in the eurozone. But during its own crisis, it, like Greece, eventually lobbied heavily for debt relief. In late 2010, Ireland received an 85 billion euro ($94 billion) loan package in exchange for austerity, recapitalizing and restructuring the banking system, and passing structural reforms. At that time, it did not ask for debt relief, and none was offered.

Ireland's Prime Minister Enda Kenny speaks during a news conference ahead of an EU leaders meeting in Brussels, March 14, 2013.

But two years later, in June 2012, Irish Prime Minister Enda Kenny began to push for it. He announced that he had made a promise together with European leaders to “break the

Loading, please wait...

Browse Related Articles on {{search_model.selectedTerm.name}}

{{indexVM.results.hits.total | number}} Articles Found

  • {{bucket.key_as_string}}