Since the beginning of October, seven Israelis have been stabbed to death by a handful of Palestinian youths from East Jerusalem. Israel responded with fatal force, shooting down many of the attackers, and stepped up security in the Arab areas within East Jerusalem, such as in Anata, a Palestinian village that is technically a part of the city but lies on the West Bank side of the barrier.

Anata on a wintry day.
Tali Mayer

Once a fertile agricultural village, Anata is now better known for producing rock-throwing youths. Juma, 22, was one of them: born after the Oslo Accords, which led to the creation of the Palestinian Authority, but before the wall first went up. Like many other youths in East Jerusalem, he spent time in Israeli prison for a number of security breaches, such as attacking Israeli police and security forces, according to Tali Mayer, a Jerusalem-based photojournalist who spent two years photographing the lives of these young Palestinians. In this gallery, she attempts to show a side of them—young men worried about marriage and finding girlfriends—that belies their tough exteriors.

Hana and Muhammad, Juma's mother and brother, on a hot summer day in the living room of their house in Anata. Hana has just returned from working as a cleaning lady in the western part of East Jerusalem and is now peeling potatoes for dinner.
Tali Mayer

On a rainy day, the number 54 bus takes the residents of Anata to the center of East Jerusalem. Only those who have a blue Israeli identity card can cross the checkpoints into the city.
Tali Mayer

Husam, one of Juma's childhood friends, prays in the yard outside his house.
Tali Mayer

A wedding party on the streets of Anata.
Tali Mayer

Children playing amidst garbage in the nearby neighborhood of Shuafat in East Jerusalem. Due to decades of neglect by the municipal government, there are no playgrounds, gardens, or public parks for the children of East Jerusalem.
Tali Mayer

Khalil, 27, sits while tea is served. He is Juma’s best friend.
Tali Mayer

Young girls walk through a narrow alley in the refugee camp of Shuafat.
Tali Mayer

Juma's family prepares dinner.
Tali Mayer

Khalil takes Juma for a ride around town after his release from prison. He was accused of stealing a gun.
Tali Mayer

Juma sleeps on the floor of his family home next to his siblings. Many homes in Anata have only one bedroom and it is reserved for the mother.
Tali Mayer

Palestinians protect themselves from tear gas at the nearby Shuafat checkpoint, the only passage through the West Bank barrier. The checkpoint is often the site of clashes between Palestinian youth and Israeli security forces, and as a result it is often closed, making the journey into Jerusalem even longer.
Tali Mayer

A young resident of Anata listens to his 92-year-old grandfather who has lived through the British Mandate. He tells his grandchild that the reason their family has survived for so long is that they have always stayed out of trouble.
Tali Mayer

Juma rides a horse at sunset. “People used to ride all the way to Al-Aqsa,” he says, referring to a mosque that is located in Jerusalem's old city. Then came the security wall and what used to be a short ride into town turned into a complicated journey through Israeli checkpoints.
Tali Mayer

Juma, his brother, and their neighbor Mohammad have a smoke late at night.
Tali Mayer

Juma sits among his prized pigeons, which he raises with his father.
Tali Mayer

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