Jordan's Muslim Brotherhood leader Hammam Saed speaks during a news conference with the group's Islamic Action Front Party in Amman March 26, 2011.
Muhammad Hamed / Courtesy Reuters

Today, the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt is down, if not completely out. After the Egyptian military deposed President Mohamed Morsi, a ranking Brotherhood bureaucrat, in July, Egypt’s courts charged him with a litany of felonies and the army cracked down, shooting more than a thousand of his supporters and detaining most of the Brotherhood’s leadership. Last week, an Egyptian court issued an injunction to dissolve the group altogether and seize its assets, outlawing “all activities” by the 85-year year-old Islamist movement. As bad as things are for the Egyptian Brotherhood, however, it isn’t the only chapter of the organization that faces setbacks. More than two years into the Arab revolts that saw Islamist gains in Tunisia, Libya, Syria, and, at least temporarily, Egypt, Muslim Brothers in Jordan are in the middle of their own crisis.  

Once a powerful voice for electoral reform, a vocal critic of palace

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  • DAVID SCHENKER is director of the Program in Arab Politics at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
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