TruckPR / Flickr A long-haul truck with LNG tank.

The Export King

Meet America's Unlikeliest Gas Mogul

It was 2002, and the race to find natural gas in the United States was on. Oilmen and businessmen were making massive bets on overlooked U.S. fields. Charif Souki was just as sure the United States needed new energy supplies. And he was certain he had a way to get his hands on enough natural gas to change his country’s fortunes, as well as his own.

Souki was a rank outsider to the oil patch. He hadn’t taken a single geology or engineering course -- or even worked a day in an oil or gas field. He had no business imagining himself as any kind of energy player. But Souki had an audacious plan.


Souki was born in Cairo in 1953, a year after a coup d’état led by Muhammad Naguib and Gamal Abdel Nasser. His father, Samyr, a Greek Orthodox Christian, moved the family to Beirut when Charif was four, after Samyr realized that his writing was being censored and that he was being tracked by members of the regime. In Beirut, Samyr, who went by Sam, became Newsweek’s chief correspondent for the Middle East. As he covered subsequent upheavals, including the 1957 war, as well as Beirut’s growth into an intellectual, tourist, and banking center, Sam emerged as a star reporter.

It didn’t take long for him to become a key adviser to political and business leaders throughout the region. As a boy, Charif sometimes sat with his father as he entertained

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